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Baker's Dozen

Corrupting Sonic DNA: Moby's Favourite Albums
Luke Turner , September 24th, 2013 08:18

Moby talks Luke Turner through his formative musical influences, from Nick Drake and OMD to the sound of New York via Suicide, Silver Apples, Eric B & Rakim and Public Enemy

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Will Sergeant - Themes For Grind
I was an obsessive Echo & The Bunnymen fan, Crocodiles and Heaven Up Here especially, so when Themes For Grind came out... this might be a little creepy, but I was in a record store at the time, I was flat broke, and my girlfriend came from a really wealthy family, so I sort of talked her into buying it, knowing she pretty well wouldn't like it. I think she was a freshman at college at the time, and I remember being in her dorm room and listening to it over and over.

I still maintain it's one of the most beautiful records. I don't know anyone else who has ever heard this record. I bumped into Will Sergeant at an art opening and introduced myself and told him how much I love Themes For Grind and he looked at me kind of confused, and said 'how have you even heard this, no-one has heard this record!' I have the vinyl of it somewhere but I couldn't find it online to buy so he very kindly sent me a Dropbox version of the album. My girlfriend eventually got into it. Even though it's very experimental, it's really beautiful. All the sounds on it are very odd and idosyncratic, but it's also got a really wonderful sense of atmosphere and melody.

Boy, if I could be an evangelist for one record that people hadn't heard it'd be this one... but I don't even know how you'd get to hear it. Unless you email Will Sergeant.


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