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Baker's Dozen

Burnt Ends: Slackk's Favourite Albums
Oli Marlow , October 2nd, 2014 13:46

The Liverpool-via-London grime producer and Boxed co-founder released his debut album, Palm Tree Fire, last month. Now, he talks Oli Marlow through his favourite records, taking in LPs, mixtapes, pirate radio sets and magazine cover-mounts. Slackk photograph courtesy of Mehdi Lacoste

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702 - Star (first half)
I wouldn't even say this qualifies as a favourite album because the second half of it's shit. Track 11 to track 16 or 17: bollocks, don't ever listen to it. But the first ten? Incredible mate! I wanted to tip one of those early 2000s R&B albums. I could've said Missy Elliott, Miss E... So Addictive which is an incredible album - well, there were loads around then - but this, it isn't one of them. I discovered it a bit later on but, mate, the first ten tracks on this are fucking incredible. There's a really underappreciated Neptunes beat that never got released as a single, a tune called 'I Still Love You' which is so weird and so moody and there's a couple of beats by Shakespeare, who did like 'Pop Your Collar' and 'Bugaboo' and bits like that. It's obviously very popular sounding and it's not a controversial thing to say but growing up in a certain area and at a certain age this sort of music was ubiquitous, y'know? Especially when you're trying to get into girls it's like, "I need me some R&B".

The album bombed but the first ten tracks are really, really strong. It's several different producers but it's a testament to those beats that it works because none of these girls can really sing that well and really, the first ten tracks are like a producer mixtape in a way. I wanted to refer to it because as much as I can't make it to save my life, early 2000s R&B is obviously a massive influence on all the music we're talking about here and most things that have come afterwards with grime and everything and a lot of those early sets in 2000/2001 are as much based on pitched-up Timbaland things as they are original grime beats or dark garage or whatever.


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