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Paul McCartney Was The Best Beatle - Fact, By Jeremy Allen
Jeremy Allen , June 7th, 2016 08:30

Jeremy Allen goes to watch Macca live in Paris and ponders the changing perceptions of Lennon and McCartney

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Photograph by MJ Kim/MPL

When the biography Many Years From Now was published in 1997, it was met with some incredulity, with critics suggesting it was a work of propaganda overseen by its manoeuvring subject. Was Paul McCartney, who spoke extensively with author Barry Miles over five years and thirty-five tapes (and was granted final copy approval), trying to change perceptions regarding who did what in the Fab Four? This sat uneasily with some, particularly as his partner in rhyme was no longer around to repudiate any such claims. And besides, most pop fans and fans of the Beatles in particular, probably couldn’t care less who wrote what line, or who was hanging out with Karlheinz Stockhausen and luminaries of the avant garde scene in London during the 1960s, or who for that matter embraced musique concrète or had the idea to incorporate experimental tape loops into the music in the first place. Most are just happy to sing along and luxuriate in the magic, regardless of authorship or origin.

If John Lennon was a charismatic, iconoclastic and sometimes demagogic figure in life, then his stature as demigod became even more mythical and hyperbolic after he was murdered in 1980, with the long shadow it cast leaving his erstwhile bandmates feeling like bit part players for a time. "When John got shot, aside from the pure horror of it, the lingering thing was, 'OK, well, now John's a martyr. A JFK,'" McCartney told Esquire in a 2015 interview. "I started to get frustrated because people started to say, 'Well, he was The Beatles.' And me, George and Ringo would go, 'err, hang on. It's only a year ago we were all equal-ish.’” This was certainly still on his mind in 2002 when he reversed the legendary Lennon and McCartney imprimatur on songs he’d exclusively written (‘Yesterday’, ‘Hey Jude’, ‘Blackbird’ etc), provoking a tsunami of ire, including some cross words from Lennon’s widow, Yoko Ono.

Given the canonical reverence afforded to the Beatles entire oeuvre and its likelihood of immortality, this does seem petty in the great scheme of things, and to cast McCartney as some kind of underdog would be ridiculous too. If his cross to bear is combating the forces of hagiography at its most spurious, then it’s the ultimate first world problem for an artist whose legacy is undoubtedly secure. Boo hoo for the mighty architect of modern pop, violins for the genius who wrote ‘Eleanor Rigby’. And yet, having said all that, it’s difficult not to feel a modicum of sympathy, even if there are far more pressing matters of imbalance and injustice to froth about. And besides, maybe those controversial seeds he sowed in ‘97 have taken root now, because along with the pisstakery about the thumbs aloft and the hip cat speak, he has started to get his dues in arcane places such as The Wire magazine.

McCartney claims to have given up fighting over who sits where at the top table anyway now, and perhaps he’s started to relax a little bit too. Certainly his acceptance of the importance of his own body of work is in full evidence tonight. The self-aggrandising nature of the whole evening would appear immodest from any lesser artisan. During the hour we wait for him to come on stage at the AccorHotels Arena, we’re treated to a megamix - The Beatles, Wings, duets and solo singles all leaking into each other - a nonstop nostalgia mixtape amalgamating ‘You Can’t Do That’ with ‘Tomorrow Never Knows’, ‘Say Say Say’ with ‘Listen To What The Man Said’, and so on. He’s preaching to the converted here in the chapel of McCartney, and the only support act he needs is the vast swathes of music he’s already created.

It’s a career so abundant that even the 36 songs over three hours played this evening, together with the extended Jive Bunny mashup of a pre-show, still can’t quite do justice to a back catalogue of such magnitude. There’s nobody left alive who can boast his kind of success as a writer and musician (Madonna, Elton, Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd have each sold about half what the Beatles managed). It’s by definition phenomenal, and yet, having written so many of the 20th century’s greatest songs, the set is also uneven, with so much greatness punctuated sporadically with slapdash moments and the odd offering of doggerel.

The more recent ‘Save Us’ is sandwiched between ‘A Hard Day’s Night’ and ‘Can’t Buy Me Love’; ‘Four Five Seconds’ comes between ‘Lady Madonna’ and ‘Michelle’; ‘Letting Go’ and ‘Let Me Roll It’ are either side of the mighty ‘Temporary Secretary’, which McCartney introduces as a “chanson electronique”. There’s also time for an outing of ‘Ob-la-Di Ob-la-Da’, which divides opinion like few other Beatles’ “classics”. ‘Queenie Eye’ from NEW has a rambunctious ‘Hey Bulldog’ quality to it (and as a consequence is one of Macca’s finer 21st century moments), but it does leave you hankering for the actual ‘Hey Bulldog’.

‘Temporary Secretary’ stands out in a show that is essentially a band proving how much they can rock out; an ill-advised jam on Hendrix’s ‘Foxy Lady’ proves this to be so. McCartney, who has returned to vintage mullet, bestrides his Hofner bass with legs that seem impossibly long these days, and despite all the ageism chucked his way when he dares to dust off ‘Hey Jude’ for any civic event, he’s remarkably spritely for a man who’ll be 74 next month.

He reaffirms the fact he loves Paris, something he’s said often, with tonight being extra special - the city “deserves some good old rock & roll” he says, with the subtext being that it’s had to contend with too much bullshit lately. He even makes the effort, introducing some of the songs in French (with a little help from his cue cards). It’s just a pity there aren’t a few more oddities thrown in, or anything from Ram, his finest solo album. But in many ways these shows provide a service to the default memories of so many. His tours are now essentially roadshows for people’s recollections sprinkled with latter efforts that will never carry the same gravitas as those 60s and early 70s hits; it must feel like a losing battle, but McCartney’s a striver. Over familiarity with the old stuff is a curse that afflicts most living legends, though Lennon - cut down at just 40 years of age and having given up touring for many years before his assassination - will never know what it feels like. Swings and roundabouts.

The fact that McCartney does keep striving gives him many extra brownie points when that fatuous but all but inevitable “who was the best Beatle?” question rolls around. Aside from his magnificent, always tasteful bass playing, his preternatural sense of melody, his skilled arrangements, his mastery of every instrument and all the rest of it, it’s his keenness to keep abreast of contemporary musical mores that marks him out as by far and away the most innovative Beatle. It’s an instinct that has never left him, whether it’s recording with in demand young producers like Paul Epworth and Mark Ronson on 2013’s NEW, or working with Kanye West and Rihanna last year.

Obviously Lennon had all options cruelly taken away from him - a fact we’re reminded of when McCartney plays the kaleidoscopic and wonderfully off-kilter ‘Being For The Benefit Of Mr Kite’ and the poignant ‘Here Today’ - but Lennon’s solo career was a litany of compromise, an assumption of his rock & roll roots always looking backwards, and that’s only when he could be arsed. McCartney conversely pressed relentlessly forwards, erring and electrifying as he went. Take for instance Lennon’s Double Fantasy in 1980, his last album whilst he was still alive. It’s typical of his solo output: self-indulgent, self-referential, retrogressive; the only difference compared with other work under his own name is that at 48 minutes, there’s more of it to disappoint. In the same year, McCartney II was a revelation, a cavalcade of synths, electronic noises and studio experimentation, an influential milestone for electronica and even early hip hop. McCartney is by his very nature a fearless outlier forever attempting to subvert the mainstream, and while he fails now and again - sometimes embarrassingly so - he’s never dull. Lennon on the other hand peaked on the White Album (The Beatles), phoning in some of his finest ever songs while he retreated into opiated and loved up bliss in Montagu Square, striking gold again and again despite having lost interest in his own band (the workmanlike McCartney’s output on that album is more hit and miss).

There’s a theory that Lennon was McCartney’s quality control, and given Macca’s waywardness in the 70’s and ability to write entire albums of turd (Wings’ 1978 London Town LP springs to mind), there may be some truth in that. But when someone has given musical birth to - and can include - the delectable ‘Maybe I’m Amazed’ and the dreamy ‘Here There And Everywhere’, the anthemic ‘Let It Be’ and ‘Hey Jude’ - all played on an elevated grand - the emphatic ‘Band On The Run’, and the explosive ‘Live And Let Die’ (complete with dangerously loud pyrotechnics) all in the same set, then frankly they’ve earned the right to put whatever they like out, including singsongy nursery rhymes aimed at their own kids. As time wears on, Lennon’s contribution to modern culture - though enormous - increasingly shakes off the mythology and allows for more objectivity, while McCartney is at last being grudgingly given the plaudits he’s owed. History will be kind to them both, but one suspects the narrative of the last 35 years will swing in McCartney’s favour eventually, even if that’s many years from now.

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Drew
Jun 7, 2016 10:44am

Great piece. You know I don't need Macca to be considered "best Beatle." It would just be nice if he and John were viewed as equal contributors and I think that has finally started to happen in the last 5 or so years.

P.S. I would rather listen to Ram, McCartney or McCartney 2 than any of Lennon or Harrison's solo albums. Paul was hit or miss but he was trying all sorts of things. John and George, as solo artists, spent their careers running in place.

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Noodles Hovar
Jun 7, 2016 10:46am

Refreshing article. I've been thinking along the same lines for some time now. Just waiting for the inevitable arrival of the reader who says "Plastic Ono Band" was the best post-Beatles solo album...

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Tim
Jun 7, 2016 10:56am

London Town has some decent songs on it! Well, I think so anyway... I'm quite fond of the title track, Cuff Link, Girlfriend, Don't Let it Bring You Down, I'm Carrying, even Famous Groupies. Wings at the Speed of Sound is far, far worse! I also love Macca's White Album tracks as much as John's.

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Drew
Jun 7, 2016 11:28am

In reply to Noodles Hovar:

One other point: Many Years From Now is actually a terrific read -- not just for what it says about the Beatles and McCartney's life in that period, but also because of the scene it sets of Swinging London. In retrospect, the harsh reaction to the book was typical of the kind of garbage McCartney has had to put up with ever since the Beatles broke up.

Consider: John Lennon in the 70s gave countless interviews where he talked about who wrote which songs in the Beatles. During that same period, Paul said next to nothing about that subject at all; in fact, Paul avoided discussing the Beatles as much as possible while John gave interview after interview. It was 17 years after Lennon died that McCartney and Barry Miles in 1997 came out with Many Years From Now, and the whole point was to correct the false record that had spread about who did what in the Beatles -- the whole "John was the genius, Paul booked the studio" garbage that Yoko helped spread. Thanks to Mark Lewisohn's research, we now know exactly who did what and as it turns out: What Paul said in Many Years From Now about who did what was accurate!

But of course, at the time the book came out, McCartney was roasted for having the temerity to actually discuss HIS OWN work and contributions to the Beatles -- like he was just supposed to genuflect at the Lennon altar for the rest of his life. Many Years From Now continues to be one of the best books about the Beatles and the only McCartney bio worth reading. And it turns out, it's an accurate and fair account.

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Tim
Jun 7, 2016 11:38am

In reply to Drew:

It is a great read, shame it sped through the 70s so quickly though. It's interesting that, as Paul says in the book, between his John's accounts of who did what only In My Life and Eleanor Rigby are in any way disputed.

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Frozen Jap
Jun 7, 2016 11:42am

Ringo

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Barry Stark
Jun 7, 2016 11:44am

Great article! I have always appreciated Macca more than Lennon. You know Tomorrow Never Knows and Hey Bulldog are both Lennon songs, right? In context it sounds like you're suggesting they belong to McCartney.

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LouAnn
Jun 7, 2016 11:54am

In reply to Barry Stark :

I think the author was just referring to the major contributions McCartney made to both Tomorrow Never Knows and Hey Bulldog. The tape loops were Paul's idea and he made most of them himself at his home, and those tape loops are crucial to Tomorrow Never Knows. Likewise, Paul's bass line for Hey Bulldog is essential and the song was called "Hey Bullfrog" until Paul started barking in the studio and John changed the lyrics. Just a couple examples of how it's really misleading to say that Beatles songs were John songs or Paul songs -- their collaboration in the studio on tracks was essential to both of their songs.

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LouAnn
Jun 7, 2016 11:54am

In reply to Barry Stark :

I think the author was just referring to the major contributions McCartney made to both Tomorrow Never Knows and Hey Bulldog. The tape loops were Paul's idea and he made most of them himself at his home, and those tape loops are crucial to Tomorrow Never Knows. Likewise, Paul's bass line for Hey Bulldog is essential and the song was called "Hey Bullfrog" until Paul started barking in the studio and John changed the lyrics. Just a couple examples of how it's really misleading to say that Beatles songs were John songs or Paul songs -- their collaboration in the studio on tracks was essential to both of their songs.

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Andrew Thomas
Jun 7, 2016 12:03pm

The Best Beatle was Pete.

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George
Jun 7, 2016 12:41pm

I lean towards Starr being the "best Beatle". Both musically and personally he's the one that got the band to really work.

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Meric Pine
Jun 7, 2016 1:21pm

I was right all along!

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Rocky Racoon
Jun 7, 2016 1:28pm

"this does seem petty in the great scheme of things" You said it yourself.

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John S.
Jun 7, 2016 1:42pm

In reply to LouAnn:

And John made "major" contributions to many of Paul's Beatles songs, right LouAnn?

Because John Lennon was murdered thus silenced both musically and as to his memories of The Beatles, he is becoming unfairly, wrongly and intentionally marginalized by his former beast friend Macca and his storm trooper unit of super-fans, called the "Macca Mad Hatters," who openly despise John and demean and diminish his contributions to the Beatles.

The misplaced and frustrating deification of John right after December 8, 1980, has easily been countered by Paul and in fact McCartney has gone too far so that now we have articles like this that claims Paul was the "best" Beatle, whatever that means.

I view Lennon and McCartney as glorious equals who changed the course of popular music and gave us a catalog to cherish forever. Neither man is a saint, far from it, but their imperfections make their story all the more interesting.

Paul never needed to worry about his legacy as a Beatle as he and John will always be the power plant of The Beatles, the greatest popular music group ever. Paul's diminishing of John since 12/09/1980 just diminishes Paul too.

Let me add that as to solo careers, it is only fair to compare John's solo work to Paul's solo work from 1970 to 1980 and even then John took five years off. Singles like "Instant Karma" and albums like POB, Imagine, Walls And Bridges and Double Fantasy(with Yoko Ono) match anything done by Paul in that same period! But John is a hazy memory much like his vocal on "Free As A Bird" and we don't get John in HD films or cool settings like the London Olympics(although the playback of his "Imagine" in the Closing Ceremony" certainly was more moving than Paul's ragged set at the Opening).

John = Paul and Paul = John. All you need is love, all together now!

P.S. "You Can't Do That," like "Hey Bulldog" and "Tomorrow Never Knows" is primarily a John written Beatles song.

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Jun 7, 2016 1:47pm

Smh. You do know you are reviewing FAUL and not Paul here mainly, right?

#paulisdead

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LouAnn
Jun 7, 2016 2:07pm

In reply to John S.:

John Lennon "is becoming unfairly, wrongly and intentionally marginalized by his former beast friend Macca and his storm trooper unit of super-fans, called the "Macca Mad Hatters," who openly despise John and demean and diminish his contributions to the Beatles."

LOL! That's nonsense. Macca fans tend to be defensive (much like the man himself) because McCartney's solo work and his role in the Beatles were so demeaned for so long. And please, don't say it wasn't -- it was St. Lennon for years after he died and the British still love to berate McCartney for anything and everything. You're sticking your head in the sand to suggest otherwise. There is absolutely no evidence -- zilch! -- that Paul has ever marginalized John. Paul's defending HIS OWN WORK does not "marginalize" John. Please reread the final sentence of my earlier post: I said that John and Paul's collaboration in the studio was crucial to BOTH of their songs.

The problem is: John fans have gotten so used to thinking it's all about John that they can't seem to tolerate any praise for McCartney. They view any praise for Paul as a diss at John. Just like you did here. Paul should just shut up, since he got to live, right? As if not being shot is some sort of prize he didn't earn.

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mhn
Jun 7, 2016 2:26pm

this article fails to examine the notion that every single member of the beatles was in fact an absolute nob. other than that, i agree.

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Drew
Jun 7, 2016 2:32pm

In reply to mhn:

Bullsh-t. None of them were "nobs." They were just flawed people, like you and me, who dealt with the pro's and cons of uberfame a lot better than most people would have.

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John S.
Jun 7, 2016 2:54pm

In reply to LouAnn:

What did you not see with my John = Paul and Paul = John? I admire both men equally. BTW, I did not miss your passive aggressive assertion that Paul made the songs "Tomorrow Never Knows" and "Hey Bulldog!"

Just last week Paul compared 1957 John Lennon's guitar playing to Linda's 1971 keyboard ability. That was yet another dig on John as 1957 Paul was no Jimi Hendrix but just knew a few more chords than the banjo trained John! But that was apples to oranges putting John on the same musical plain as Linda. That is a very recent example of Paul's need to put John down a notch at every chance.

What about Paul's need to "reclaim" "Being For The Benefit Of Mr. Kite" in 2013? What was that about? Should Yoko reclaim "We Can Work It Out" for John for his significant contributions in the lyrics?

Why does Paul hate Mark Lewisohn's Volume I? Is it because John is treated as an equal to Paul! That can be the only explanation for the anger of "Early Days" because John sure is not elevated above Paul in that expansive book.

I noted that John was wrongly deified but those days are long gone. Now John is the wife beater, the druggie and the sideman to Paul and that is on Beatles Message Boards by certain "fans." That comes from the Macca Mad Hatters and not say, Rolling Stones fans!

Unlike all Macca Mad Hatters, I defend Paul's first four solo albums("McCartney" through "Red Rose Speedway") and argue that Paul did not suddenly find himself on BOTR so I am no anti-Paul person. My tireless promotion in fan circles of the soon to be released "Pure McCartney," (as you know, a comprehensive collection of Paul's solo work curated by Paul himself) should earn me a pat on the back by the old boy himself!

So LouAnn, is this writer right? Is Paul McCartney the best Beatle? Is that an objective fact from their recorded body of work from 1962 to 1970?

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LouAnn
Jun 7, 2016 3:16pm

In reply to John S.:

John S: I didn't say Paul "made" Tomorrow Never Knows and Hey Bulldog. I was responding to another post that questioned why they were mentioned in this article and I merely explained Paul's major contribution to both of those songs. Calm down, sir. I wasn't taking anything away from John by pointing out that Paul heavily influenced both songs.

Second, John by his own admission only knew banjo chords when he first started playing. By his own admission, John said he was taught how to play guitar by Paul. So why does that somehow become a diss when Paul repeats the same thing that John said. Paul taught John to play guitar; Paul taught Linda to play keyboards. That's all Paul said. It's you who interpreted that as "Paul insulted John by saying Linda was just as good a musician as John," when Paul said no such thing. That's just what YOU chose to hear.

Benefit of Mr. Kite? I don't have a problem with Paul playing any Beatles song in his shows. Why should I? Why should you? It keeps the music alive. He can play whatever he wants.

How do you know "Paul hates Mark Lewisohn's Tune In"? Paul has never mentioned the book. Early Days is a song that was written and recorded in 2012 -- a full year BEFORE Tune In was published. Early Days could be about any number of Beatles writers and revisionists. It's not just about Mark Lewisohn, and may not be at all about his book since the song was written well in advance of the book's publication.

I'm sorry but you sound like a Lennon obsessive who's trying to pretend to be an equal fan of both. But you reveal yourself by viewing everything McCartney does and says through a Lennon lens. You're looking for slights where there are none.

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Nikolay
Jun 7, 2016 3:39pm

It is foolish to look at Paul and John separately during the Beatles years. Neither one of them would have written the songs they have if it wasn't in the context of their long-term partnership. However, I disagree that Paul's songs after Beatles were "hit or miss". I think, they are predominantly "miss". If these were the only songs he ever wrote, he'd be a very modestly known man. Paul's solo hits became such because they came with the label McCartney. At the same time, John got lucky and wrote more lasting songs in his solo career. As if, Paul burned too much fuel during the Beatles years and his creativity was all exhausted there.
Overall, the article is not so good. How can you even state that one of the two was better? Are you speaking qualitatively or quantitatively? Yes, Paul wrote more Beatles hits than John. So what? George wrote even fewer, but some of his hits are going to stay with the humanity for many centuries to come. Simplistic article, with not a very admirable purpose.

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Clark Gwent
Jun 7, 2016 4:23pm

There was no "best Beatle." To think there was such a being is to have misunderstood the Beatles.

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Alexander
Jun 7, 2016 4:57pm

The one I can never understand is why certain people accuse Paul McCartney of being
'sentimental' as a songwriter and then fail to specify which songs they're referring to.
There is too much sincerity in his music and the melodies are too accomplished for him to be dismissed as sentimental - We're talking about a guy who wrote some of the great songs of the 20th century before he'd even turned 30.

The only well-known Macca song which I would say is undoubtedly awful is 'Ebony & Ivory' - There was also that silly song he did with Michael Jackson ('The-goddamn-girl-is-mine') but he was a guest singer on that one. I've never been overly keen on 'Mull of Kintyre' which I find a bit trite, but not awful.
He might have scattered his talent, somewhat in his solo career, but that's a mark of the man's restless creativity and childlike passion for music. The much-maligned 'Silly Love Songs' has one of the best arrangements in seventies pop - Dig the bassline, or just listen to the strings on it. Even the Frog song was clearly meant as an entertaining song for children so in that respect, it works fine.

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John Bonaccorsi, Phila PA USA
Jun 7, 2016 6:23pm

Hold on a second. "I'm Carrying"?

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John S.
Jun 7, 2016 6:25pm

In reply to Clark Gwent :

I agree with this completely! We all have our favorite Beatle(s) but each man was essential to the overall chemistry of the band.

Having said that, I stand by my earlier comment that Lennon/McCartney were the "power plant" of The Beatles and their song catalog is an amazing asset that will never be seen again in popular music!

I saw this article's headline and groaned but more worrisome to me were reader's comments along the lines of, "About time Paul got his dues!"

Paul has always gotten his Beatles' dues! For every book like "Shout!" that was unfair to Paul there is a Geoff Emerick book that was grossly unfair to George and Ringo and even John from a guy who couldn't tell you what he had for breakfast yesterday let alone reconstruct conversations from 1966 to 1969.

Paul was wrongly savaged in his early solo career by the Rock Press and some of his own Beatles fans who wanted Abbey Road Paul not Ram or Wild Life Paul when actually Paul shines on those first four solo albums, liberated and free! Paul though was always viewed as a vital Beatle.

Paul could have helped us fans heal from John's murder instead we heard phrases like 'Maneuvering Swine' and "Martin Luther Lennon" before the horror of December 8, 1980, was out of our minds!

Paul has been in a tug of war since 12/08/1980 that has been completely unnecessary. "For well you know that its a fool who plays it cool by making his world a little colder!"

Enjoy and savor each Beatle.

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Al
Jun 7, 2016 6:38pm

In reply to John S.:

Gees, you're criticizing Paul for 40 year old comments he made at a time when he was traumatized himself. Let it go already. You're holding a grudge on a dead guy's behalf for a long time. Why is McCartney responsible for helping you heal? Anyway, everyone praised John for telling "the truth" but when Paul tells the truth -- that sometimes John was a maneuvering swine, and he was -- you instead want Paul to lie and to sugarcoat things and tell you what you want to hear and "help you heal." FFS, just enjoy the music and quit sitting in judgment of the boy who lived.

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Maccafan
Jun 7, 2016 7:23pm

In reply to Al:

I don't think that Jimi Hendrisx jame is ill advised at all, I enjoy it everytime!

I don't think Paul McCartney will ever get the real true credit he deserves, and I don't think his Wings/solo music gets the real true credit it deserves!

McCartney should be performing so much of that material live right now, he should be showcasing more of what he's done since the Beatles.

The man has so much absolutely amazing music that he just ignores? He could put together a show without playing one single Beatle song, and it would still be filled with excellent music and hits!

Post Beatles Paul McCartney, has never received the real true credit he more than deserves!

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jeres
Jun 7, 2016 8:12pm

In reply to Clark Gwent :

Why I outta...

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Chollie
Jun 7, 2016 8:46pm

By definition, the best Beatle was Pete!

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Bent Lingham
Jun 7, 2016 9:23pm

....I have been informed that Norman "Hurricane " Smith was the real genius in the studio who created the peak Beatles sound, and that George Martin wrote and arranged most of their material. Like the Monkees, the solo individual members of the Beatles never wrote or recorded anything equal to the caliber and quality of the Beatles after leaving George Martin, each other, and Abbey Road. Even AS the Beatles, the one project without Martin, ( Let it Be, with Phil Spector ), was a crappy sounding turd that featured primitive and simplistic arrangements..... an admitted EMBARRASSMENT for all of them.

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Sean
Jun 7, 2016 9:44pm

In reply to Bent Lingham:

Nice bit of trolling. But did it fail to escape your notice that George Martin never produced another band like the Beatles? So if he "wrote and arranged" all the songs, how come he didn't keep doing that after the band split? Or maybe you're suggesting George Martin died in 1970 in car crash and was replaced by a double.
--
And if Norm Smith was responsible for their "sound" how come their sound was just as great but completely different after he left in 1965.
--
You probably think Paul died in 1966, right?

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G.
Jun 7, 2016 10:23pm

I think even though Lennon's solo output could definitely tend retrograde, he wasn't as revanchist as people think. I mean the man was spurred back into recording by the B-52s in the late '70s and he hooked his wagon to Yoko Ono's for a reason. He had his comfort food in blues and hard rock the same way McCartney's is balladry, music hall and a bit of show tunes. Paul got undue shit for decades but this might be where it starts to feel like an overcorrection.

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Bruce
Jun 7, 2016 11:15pm

The fact that you used the word "fact" is like folks who say "literally" when they don't actually mean literally. The concept of "best" is so subjective that your entire premise is ridiculous.

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Music nerdhipster
Jun 8, 2016 12:57am

Very thoughtful article. Now the next question; who was the best Sonic youth, Lee, Thurston or Kim?

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ST
Jun 8, 2016 1:48am

Paul's hit and miss White Album, correct. Bad songs in White Album: Honey Pie, Wild Honey Pie, Rocky Rocoon, Why Don't We Do It, Don't Pass Me By, Revolution 9.

Paul advant garde and John retrogressive? Retrogressive: Tomorrow, A Day, Rain, Strawberry, Lucy, Walrus, Bulldog. Advant garde: 64, All Together Now, Honey Pie (2), Rocky, Maxwell?

Paul advant garde and contributes? Why all in John's songs?

Paul contributes to Tomorrow and Bulldog? Sure. But hard to trace. John's contribution to She's Leaving Home, obvious.

If he seems to press forward, that is after Beatles but no where near the level of John's in Beatles.

John and Paul are great song writers. They write great songs individually and together. The individual's part songs are put together to become a whole great song. They help each other complete the other's songs. They contribute to enhance the other's songs. Must be. But the progressive ones always appear in John's.

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apollo c vermouth
Jun 8, 2016 2:55am

In reply to ST:

Hmm,

You had your conclusion and so then tried to offer some examples.
i.e.
Paul's (obvious/well known) contributions 'hard to trace'?
But John's contribution to SHL 'obvious'?

You know what George said about one often misused French expression?

..'avant garde a clue'.

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Jun 8, 2016 5:31am

In reply to apollo c vermouth:

Hard to trace refers to Tomorrow and Bulldog in the article.

Obvious one: She,...what did we do....

But it is not a good example, as you will argue that Paul obviously contributes "Woke up...". 2 best songs in Sergeant (still, most will agree A Day is better). But then, it is obvious who is the main writer for the progressive and who the traditional.

Traditional doesn't always means less good of course. How do Real Love and Now and Then (and Grow Old has splendid piano parts) fare compared to the mighty Temporary? John is equally good in both but Paul seems stronger in one and his advant garde side perhaps only menifests successfully in John's Tomorrow and Bulldog (which only an expert like the writer of the article and an not ordinary fan can tell).

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Rob Wilson
Jun 8, 2016 6:05am

Irrelevant topic - each band member, including Sir George Martin, contributed pluses and minuses Howard an evolving, singular, lasting body of work.

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Gero
Jun 8, 2016 10:44am

In reply to Noodles Hovar:

He just arrived, but I reckon 'Ram' is is a cracker as well.

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Gero
Jun 8, 2016 10:47am

In reply to Noodles Hovar:

He just arrived, but I love 'Ram' as well.

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Gero
Jun 8, 2016 10:56am

In reply to Noodles Hovar:

He just arrived, but I love 'Ram' as well.

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Jun 8, 2016 11:59am

this is all the bollocks, anyone with half a brain knows the best Beatle, was anyone who was in the Rolling
Stones.

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Jun 8, 2016 2:19pm

Here is a really good July 1976 Rolling Stone Magazine interview with George Martin in which he's asked about George Harrison who he says is talented but John and Paul are so enormously talented.But it's obvious George Harrison was even more talented as a song writer and guitarist than most people realize because in this same interview George Martin says that he didn't give George much encouragement he just tolerated him. And of course John and Paul didn't give him much encouragement,so he did mostly everything on his own.

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/features/george-martin-recalls-the-boys-in-the-band-19760715?page=2#comments

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 2:21pm

Around 2003 I found an online interview with George Martin and he said that even though he has produced many other music artists and he has never had the same success before or after producing The Beatles,he has never known or worked with anyone as brilliant as The Beatles. He was also interviews in the 1990's on a Breakfast With The Beatles show on a local rock station,and he said that John Lennon and Paul McCartney were incredibly talented people and he said it like he still couldn't believe it.And he also said they both were extraordinarily talented song writers and great singers.

And in the excellent thorough book by Mark Lewisohn,The Beatles Recording Sessions,George Martin,and so many of The Beatles tape operators and recording engineers are interviewed,(and in the beginning there is a great 1987 interview with Paul McCartney) and they describe in detail how truly innovative, brilliant and creative especially John and Paul were in their amazing 8 year recording career. And there is a big black and white picture of Mick Jagger sitting in between John and Paul in the recording console room listening to the playback of the songs from The Beatles Revolver album.


And my cousin who was born in 1968 who used to be a lawyer,and his brother born in 62 who is still a lawyer,and their sister born in 64,their oldest brother born in 60,and their parents have always been Beatles fans. My cousin born in 68,went to England around 1991 and he told me that he was at a British Museum where the works of Shakespeare,Dickens,Wodsworth and Keats,Lennon and McCartney's lyrics are right in the same case. And he said the majority of visitors always said,forget the Shakespeare etc,lets go over to the Lennon and McCartney lyrics.


When I once asked him,if he still liked The Beatles he said,best band there ever was.My step cousin born in 1958,said they probably were the greatest band ever.He saw Paul McCartney and Wings in May 1976 in concert when he was 18 and he said it was a great show.

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 2:24pm

I also don't think London Town is a dud,it's not a great album like Band On The Run and especially Venus and Mars,but it's an above average good album.I think McCartney Two is mostly a dud besides Paul playing every instrument all by himself great,like he did on his good first solo album,McCartney.

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Jun 8, 2016 2:28pm

John's songs on Double Fantasy are all very good,and his first solo album,John Lennon Plastic Ono Band is as brilliant as most music critics say it is.And his Imagine album is very good and a lot of it is brilliant too.I really like his 1974 Walls and Bridges album that he produced and arranged by himself,especially the brilliant,beautiful song Number Nine Dream.

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 2:36pm

In reply to Andrew Thomas:

I really hope you are joking because if not,that's really ignorant and ridiculous.

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 2:37pm

This 1999 review of Mark Lewisohn's excellent Beatles studio diary book where many of The Beatles recording engineers and tape operators and their producer George Martin are interviewed (and it shows how truly innovative,brilliant and creative especially John and Paul were in the recording studio),The Beatles Recording Sessions titled, Behind The Creative Genius Of A Groundbreaking Band by a musician himself says it all, he says that as a musician he found Mark Lewisohn's portrayal of The Beatles genius and in parenthesis he says, especially that of John Lennon and Paul McCartney, to be completely thorough and accurate, as well as insightful. He then says if you are to buy any one Beatles book,buy this one.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Complete-Beatles-Recording-Sessions/product-reviews/1454910054/ref=cm_cr_dp_see_all_summary?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1&sortBy=helpful;;



And this reviewer RAS who became a big Beatles fan after he read The Beatles Recording Sessions book,said,I think The Beatles ARE BRILLIANT and he said he despairs what his life would be like without The Beatles!!


http://www.amazon.com/The-Complete-Beatles-Recording-Sessions/product-reviews/1454910054/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_paging_btm_2?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1&sortBy=helpful&pageNumber=2

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 2:47pm

In reply to mhn:

No,they were brilliant! The most creative,diverse,prolific,brilliant rock band ever.

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Jun 8, 2016 2:49pm

This is a great August 1986 hour long Paul McCartney interview by Barbara Hower from Entertainment This Week. :) She asked him a lot of great intelligent questions including how he felt about John Lennon's horrible,tragic murder and she got a rare great interview out of him and he comes across as very likeable intelligent,funny,serious and charming. I still have this interview on an old VHS tape from the time. It's not on youtube though for some reason. Unfortunately it gets interrupted by advertisements but then the interview resumes.But I just watched it again and there were no commercials now,I hope they don't include them again.

Paul also says in this interview that soon after John died Yoko called him up and told Paul that John really loved him.


He also says that George and Ringo besides John are highly,highly talented guys.

Notice how uncomfortable Paul's face expression is for about a minute in this great August 1986 hour long Paul McCartney interview by Barbara Hower from Entertainment This Week when she says to him,probably your first great love before you married Linda was Jane Asher,it struck a chord.I'm sure that Paul was really in love with Jane too,you don't write the beautiful love songs such as And I Love Her,Things We Said Today, and Here There Everywhere,(plus the great songs he wrote about his arguments with her,which was his own fault because of his sexism constantly trying to get Jane to give up her acting career she loved so much and that she had been doing since she was 5 years old.

















http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x3qtunj


















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RB
Jun 8, 2016 2:59pm

In reply to Nikolay:

Paul McCartney's early solo early Wings music which includes a lot of great rock and even some hard rock from 1970-1975 which is Paul's best post Beatles music.

Here the very good Russian music reviewer George Starostin reviews Paul McCartney's solo and Wings albums and songs and he so rightly debunks the common stupid myth that Paul's solo and Wings music wasn't very good.He gave almost all of Paul's 1970's albums good and great reviews.

http://starling.rinet.ru/music/paul.htm


Paul McCartney is still in the Guinness Book of World Records since October 1979 as the most successful song composer of all time.

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 3:01pm

This is my amazon.com review of Paul McCartney and Wings great 1975 album,Venus and Mars which I think is an even much better album than the very good Band On The Run album.

For anyone to say or think that Venus & Mars is not a good album (and thank God that by the majority of great reviews on amazon.com where it gets a well deserved 5 stars out of over 100 reviews for this album,they are very clearly much in the minority!) has to be deaf & dumb! This is one of the *GREATEST* solo/Wings Paul albums he ever did! It's great and it's Beatles quality because every song is very good & if anyone wants to know what a true music genius Paul really is,just listen to the *music* in the great jazz rock song Letting Go!

My mother only liked classical music,Beethoven,Bach & Mozart,no rock & she played their music on the piano.When I was playing this album and she came into the room when Letting Go was on,she asked me is that Paul McCartney and I said yes and she said Oh that music is brilliant,he's a music genius like Beethoven!

And my sister who is 4 years older than me and had a big diverse music collection since she was a mid teen,bought Venus and Mars when it came out,and I remember listening to it with her,and her friend and my best friend and we all loved it! My sister still says years later that Venus and Mars is one of the best rock albums she ever heard and that it's unique and she knows no album like it!She always said his 1971 Ram album was a very good album too,although I like this album much better and I really don't understand all of the love everywhere for his Ram album I think it only has 3 great songs on it,the great rocker Too Many People,Uncle Albert and Back Seat of My Car. Paul's best post Beatles sounding music was from 1970-1975,with this being his last true great album.After this he wrote some good music but he never wrote the same great quality music again for some reason.

His first solo album McCartney where he played every instrument by himself (and he played them all great) is very good,Red Rose Speedway and Band On The Run are very good albums too,and he produced all of these great albums by himself and co-arranged the music on Venus and Mars by himself.

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 3:08pm

In reply to John S.:


In this April/May 1982 New Music Express interview with Paul McCartney he's asked about how he feels about John's murder and the it's a drag comment that he didn't mean and how horribly up set he really was and is and how he and John really loved each other.Paul also says that soon after John died he spoke with Yoko on the phone,( in a 1986 Entertainment This Week interview he says Yoko called him the day after John died and told him that John would tell Yoko that he really loved Paul) and that Yoko said to Paul,John was really fond of you,you know.

http://www.beatlesinterviews.org/db1982.0400.beatles.html

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 3:19pm

In reply to Bent Lingham:

You are totally wrong and ignorant! Not only that but Norman Smith said that most of Paul's musical arrangements were all his own in the studio.

http://abbeyrd.best.vwh.net/paulbass.htm

And see the links and description of The Beatles Recording Sessions book by Mark Lewisohn I posted.

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 3:21pm

In reply to Bent Lingham:

George Martin was very musically talented and always seemed to be a very nice person too I'm sure some people are going to be mad at me for saying this but it's really true.



Brian Epstein and George Martin were both very lucky to meet The Beatles and to have them,especially John Lennon and Paul McCartney as their employees,it was like they discovered gold or won the lottery twice and in a way three times with George Harrison too.George Martin had moderate success as a producer of mostly comedy albums before he became The Beatles producer,and he never had nearly as much success before and after producing them even though he went on to produce many other music artists. But he said that he never has known and worked with anyone as brilliant as The Beatles,especially John and Paul.


And the truth is, if Brian Epstein hadn't had the good luck of becoming their manager he would have remained a record store manager that no one ever heard of and George Martin never would have been as known and successful either.I'm sure that some other manager and producer would eventually discover John and Paul and probably George sooner or later because they were just too extremely unusually musically talented music artists for them not to be.

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 3:27pm

In reply to Bent Lingham:

As The All Music Guide says in their excellent Beatles biography "That it's difficult to summarize their career without restating cliches that have already been digested by tens of millions of rock fans, to start with the obvious,they were the greatest and most influential act of the rock era and introduced more innovations into popular music than any other rock band of the 20th century."

"Moreover they were among the few artists of *any* discipline that were simultaneously the best at what they did *and* the most popular at what they did." They also say as singers John Lennon and Paul McCartney were among the best and most expressive in rock.

Also on an excellent site,The Evolution of Rock Bass Playing McCartney Style by Dennnis Alstrand,Stanley Clarke,Sting,Will Lee,Billy Sheehan,George Martin and John Lennon are quoted saying what a great,melodic and influential bass player Paul has always been.

http://abbeyrd.best.vwh.net/paulbass.htm

And Wilco's John Stirratt was asked in Bass Player which bass players have had the most impact on his playing and the first thing he said was, Paul McCartney is one of the greatest bass players of all time,if you listen to what he was tracking live in the studio it's unbelievable." "With his tone and musicality he was a huge influence,he covered all of his harmonic responsibilities really well but his baselines were absolutely melodic and inventive."


http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/15716769/windy-city-wingman-john-stirratt-lays-roots-wilco



In this 2010 interview the blogger says that John Stirratt has an affinity for good melodies so it's not surprising that Paul McCartney is one of his musical icons and then he quotes him saying that he's always absolutely in awe of his playing,including Paul's Beatles years.
http://audreeanne.blogspot.com/2010/02/interview-wilcos-john-stirratt-talk.html

And in an online 1977 Eric Clapton interview,Eric Clapton In His Own Words he says that there was always this game between John and George,and he said partly because John was a pretty good guitar player himself http://www.superseventies.com/ssericclapton.html .He played live with John as a member of John's 1969 Plastic Ono Band.

And there is a great online article by musician and song writer Peter Cross,The Beatles Are The Most Creative Band Of All Time and he says that many musicians besides him recognize Paul as one of the best bass guitar players ever.He too says that John and Paul are the greatest song composers and that to say that John and Paul are among 2 of the greatest singers in rock and roll is to state the obvious,and that John,Paul and George were all excellent guitarists and that George is underrated by people not educated about music but that Eric Clapton knew better,he also says that both John and Paul played great leads as well as innovative rhythm tracks.

John Lennon co-wrote,sang and played guitar on one of David Bowie's first hits Fame in 1975 and David invited John to play guitar on his version of John's beautiful Beatles song Across The Universe.Brain May,Ozzy Osbourne,and Liam Gallagher and many more call The Beatles The Greatest Band Ever.'


http://ezinearticles.com/?The-Beatles-are-the-Most-Creative-Band-of-All-Time&id=222245


Also on MusicRadar Tom Petty,Joe Perry and Richie Sambora in What The Beatles Mean To Me all say how cool and great they thought The Beatles were when they first saw them on The Ed Sullivan Show in February 1964 when they were just teen boys,Richie was only 5.Tom Petty said he thought they were really really great.

Robin Zander of Cheap Trick said he's probably one of the biggest Beatles fans on the planet.Brad Whitford of Aerosmith said that a lot of that Beatles influence comes from Steven Tyler's collaborartion with Mark Hudson both whom are absolute Beatles freaks and he said I guess the goal is to try and emulate probably some of the best music of the last 50 years which has to be The Beatles.




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RB
Jun 8, 2016 3:29pm

In reply to Bent Lingham:

Here is university of Penn graduate,musicologist Alan Pollack's whole extensive 11 year analysis of all 200 Beatles songs

http://www.icce.rug.nl/~soundscapes/DATABASES/AWP/awp-notes_on.shtml

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 3:31pm

In reply to Bent Lingham:

The early Beatles lyrics were more simple but a lot of their early music was actually much more complex. Just one of many examples I always loved this very early John song written and recorded in 1962

Ask Me Why.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Ex-epsPWoc

I have always loved this great beautiful song written by John,with such typical beautiful melodies and harmonies John and Paul usually wrote,and John's usual beautiful singing voice.And this was amazingly recorded in 1962 on only two track tape! with such limited,primitive recording technology but it of course still sounds great.Except I hate mono it's limited sounding and only makes their already limited recording technology sound even more limited.I tried to find the stereo version of this song on youtube but I couldn't find it.

Here university of Pennsylvania musicologist Alan W.Pollack who did an 11 year extensive analysis of every one of the 200 Beatles songs,analyzes Ask Me Why and explains that it's structurally complex.

http://www.icce.rug.nl/~soundscapes/DATABASES/AWP/amw.shtml

Here is Alan's whole Beatles song analysis series http://www.icce.rug.nl/~soundscapes/DATABASES/AWP/awp-notes_on.shtml

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 3:33pm

In reply to Bent Lingham:

Also in an excellent Beatles book Ticket To Ride by Denny Somach where so many other well known popular respected rock musicians and artists are interviewed about The Beatles praising them including Jimmy Page,Brian Wilson who says he's always loved The Beatles. And Brian Wilson called John & Paul the greatest song writers of the 20th century on a 1995 Nightline Beatles tribute show,(which had on music artists from every type of music,a young black jazz musician,a middle aged black opera singer,Steve Winwood,Meatloaf,and classical violinist Isak Perleman,who said he plays his children Bach,Beethoven Mozart and The Beatles)and he played With A Little Help From My Friends on the piano and he said he just loves this song. He also said that Sgt.Pepper is the greatest album he ever heard and The All Music Guide says in their Beach Boys biography,that Brian had a nervous breakdown after he heard it. Brian also said that when he first heard The Beatles brilliant 1965 folk rock album Rubber Soul he was blown away by it.He said all of the songs flowed together and it was pop music but folk rock at the same time and he couldn't believe they did this so great,this inspired him to make Pet Sounds.



John Lodge and Justin of The Moody Blues are interviewed in this book and Bill Wyman and Ron Wood says how The Rolling Stones became good friends with The Beatles in 1963 after John and Paul wrote 1 of their first hits,the Rock n Roll song,I Wanna Be You're Man.


Ron Wood was asked what his favorite Beatles songs and he said there are so many apart from the obvious like Strawberry Fields I Want To Hold Your Hand is one he said he used to like a lot ,and he said he really loved We Can Work It Out.He also says that The Beatles used to have a radio show every Friday where they played live and spoke and he would never miss an episode. He said infact whoever has the rights to those shows should dig them up,because they are incredible.


Justin Hayward says that the album he always really loved ,and he said it was when they started experimenting with chord structures ,was A Hard Day's Night.He says they began to move away from the standard 3 chord thing and just went into more interesting structures .He said A Hard Day's Night was the album for him and their song If I Fell was the song.He said it started in a different key to how it ended up,and it's a beautifully worked out song and that there are some songs on that album that were very emotional and evocative. He said that for everybody just starting to write songs as he was,it was a real turn on and eye opener.

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Jun 8, 2016 3:36pm

In reply to Bent Lingham:

From Me To You,and especially She Loves You and I Want To Hold Your Hand were praised by some music critics even from the beginning,like William Mann of The London Times in December 1963 pointed out their interesting unusual chords and arrangements and London Times music critic Richard Buckle also in late 1963 called John and Paul the greatest composers since Beethoven after they wrote the music for a play Mods and Rockers.

Bob Dylan ,Roger McGuinn of The Byrds as early as 1963 and 1964 pointed out that even in early Beatles songs like She Loves You and I Want To Hold Your Hand had unusual and interesting chords and they arranged them.

Here in this article about The Beatles chords,Bob Dylan is quoted saying what he thought in 1964 about The early Beatles music,he said that they were doing things nobody was doing and that their chords were outrageous,just outrageous and their harmonies made it all valid.
http://www.icce.rug.nl/~soundscapes/VOLUME03/Words_and_chords.shtml

Here in Rolling Stone Magazine's 100 Greatest Song Writers Bob Dylan is number 1,Paul McCartney is number 2, and John Lennon is number 3, Bob Dylan is quoted about a car trip when he heard a lot of Beatles songs on the radio, he said they were doing things and that he knew they were pointing the direction where music had to go.
http://www.rollingstone.com/music/lists/100-greatest-songwriters#john-lennon

Roger McGuinn has said that he started to play a 12 string guitar after he saw and heard George Harrison playing in in the A Hard Day's Night movie.

And John and Paul wrote one of The Rolling Stones first hits the rock n roll song, I Wanna Be Your Man in late 1963 right in front of them. And Keith Richards and Mick Jagger were impressed and said wow,how can you write a song just like that and it inspired them to start writing their own songs and both bands became good friends from then on.

John Lennon and Paul McCartney were such amazingly talented singer song writers that they were already writing hit songs for other artists as early as 1963 when their own song writing success was getting off the ground,besides The Rolling Stones,they also wrote hit songs in 1963 for Billy J.Krammer and The Dakatos,Celia Black,and Peter and Gordon etc.


Paul wrote his first song at age 14 and was playing guitar,John wrote heavy deep poetry but didn't start writing songs until he met Paul and was impressed that he wrote his own songs,and he too started to write his own songs at age 16,and they wrote together and never stopped from then on. Paul wrote the very pretty song I'll Follow The Sun at only 16.Even when The Beatles first came to America in February 1964 many people said how rare it was for *adult* rock n roll bands and solo artists to write their own songs,and Paul and John were already doing this as teenagers in the mid 1950's.

And even though I wasn't born yet in 1963 I know what type of music was popular on the radio,non rock n roll songs like Bobby Vinton,The Four Seasons,Bobby Darin and The Beach Boys surfing hits,The early Beatles songs like She Loves You, I Want To Hold Your Hand and I Saw Her Standing there etc were hard rock for 1963 and ahead of their time.

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 3:38pm

In reply to Bent Lingham:

Here in this article by Ger Tillekens about The Beatles chords,Bob Dylan is quoted saying what he thought in 1964 about The early Beatles music,he said that they were doing things nobody was doing and that their chords were outrageous,just outrageous and their harmonies made it all valid.

\
http://www.icce.rug.nl/~soundscapes/VOLUME03/Words_and_chords.shtml


Here in Rolling Stone Magazine's 100 Greatest Song Writers Bob Dylan( who is the number 1 greatest song writer,and John Lennon is number 3,and Paul McCartney is number 2.) is quoted about a car trip when he heard a lot of Beatles songs on the radio, he said they were doing things and that he knew they were pointing the direction where music had to go.

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/lists/100-greatest-songwriters#john-lennon






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RB
Jun 8, 2016 3:39pm

In reply to Bent Lingham:

NME News
Bob Dylan talks of Beatles friendship

Legend admits: 'I'm in awe of McCartney'
May 16, 2007

Bob Dylan has spoken in depth about his longstanding friendship with The Beatles and his particular bond with George Harrison.

Talking to Rolling Stone magazine, Dylan talked freely about Harrison’s struggle to find his voice within the songwriting collective of John Lennon and Paul McCartney.

"George got stuck with being the Beatle that had to fight to get songs on records because of Lennon and McCartney. Well, who wouldn’t get stuck?" he asked.

Dylan highlighted the writing talents of Harrison, saying: "If George had had his own group and was writing his own songs back then, he’d have been probably just as big as anybody."

Speaking against popular belief, the singer also denounced any rumours of competitiveness towards Lennon and McCartney, asserting, "They were fantastic singers. Lennon, to this day, it’s hard to find a better singer than Lennon was, or than McCartney was and still is."

Nodding his cap to McCartney in particular, Dylan concluded: "I’m in awe of McCartney. He’s about the only one that I am in awe of. He can do it all. And he’s never let up... He’s just so damn effortless.''

http://www.nme.com/news/bob-dylan/28350

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 3:41pm

In reply to Bent Lingham:

Award winning classical composer and music professor Dr.Glen Gass's Beatles course he's been teaching since 1982 and he's been teaching a course in rock music in general since then.


http://courses.music.indiana.edu/rock/beatles.html

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 3:44pm

In reply to Bent Lingham:

Besides what you said being totally inaccurate,ignorant and ridiculous in general,The Beatles really produced most of all of the great White Album by themselves with their engineers because George Martin went on vacation and didn't really produce it.He felt it should have been only a single album instead of the double album they thankfully made anyway.

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 3:47pm

In reply to G.:

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/the-beatles-mn0000754032/biography


No,not really true at all as Richie Utenberger wrote in his great long detailed Beatles biography for The all Music Guide,the stereotype was that John was the rocker and Paul the balladeer but the truth is they both wrote romantic ballads and ballsy out rock in equal numbers.The truth is though,it was Paul in his early solo and Wings career that was writing and playing the rock and hard rock and most of it was great.

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/the-beatles-mn0000754032/biography

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 4:44pm

In reply to John S.:

To debunk this horrible myth that John was a ''wife beater''.Cynthia Lennon said that John only ever hit her twice *before* they were married.

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 4:47pm

In reply to John S.:

To debunk this horrible myth that John was a ''wife beater''.Cynthia Lennon said that John only ever hit her twice *before* they were married.

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 4:52pm

In reply to RB:

John Lennon is a great example of people can change and are not fixed to be a certain way as a man or a woman.Yoko changed John into a much better person as a pro-feminist man and the feminist changes *are* for the better, and many pro-feminist men have recognized this too! They say it has freed them and allowed them to develop and express more of all of the shared common *human* traits,emotions,behaviors,abilities and reduce and prevent male violence against women and children etc. Definitions of "masculine" and "feminine" differ across time periods, and in different societies.


John Lennon is a great example of how feminism changing limited artificial gender definitions and roles,changed him for the much better. John as a child and teenager had a lot of traumas that permanently psychologically damaged him,but because of his and Yoko's beautiful loving relationship,and as he said she was a feminist before he met her,(and he said that because she was a feminist before he met her,they were going to have to have a 50/50 equal relationship which he never had before) he went in to primal scream therapy and Yoko went with him and he dealt with all of his pain and anger for the very first time at age 29.


When John was a young guy,he was often drunk getting into fist fights with men,hitting women,and womanizing including cheating on his girlfriends and then his first wife Cynthia.Of course Paul,George and Ringo did the same with all of the groupies all 4 of them had while touring from 1963-1966. I hadn't watched these Mike Douglas shows in years until December 2010 when it was the 30th anniversary of John's tragic crazy murder.



Out of the 5 Mike Douglas shows that John and Yoko co-hosted for a week that was taped in January 1972 and aired in February,a young criminal lawyer Rena Uviller(she went on to become a Supreme Court Judge) who worked with juveniles was on, and she,Mike Douglas,John and Yoko were discussing the then very recent women's liberation movement. George Carlin was on too.



Rena said,she agrees with Yoko,that the idea of Women's lib is to liberate all of us,and she said ,I mean we could talk hours on the way men really suffer under the sex role definitions.Yoko agreed with what she said too. Rena said that men don't really realize they have only to gain from Women's Lib,and that she thinks that maybe with a little more propaganda we can convince them.


John then said,yeah there is a lot to gain from it,just the fact that you can relax and not have to play that male role,he said we can do that,and he said that I can be weak,( but notice how then in a male dominated gender divided,gender stereotyped,sexist society,and even unfortunately still now in a lot of ways,the "female" role was defined as the weak one,and the male role as the strong one) I don't have to protect her all the time and play you know that super hero,I don't have to play that,she allows me to be weak sometimes and for me to cry,and for her to be the strong one,and for me to be the weak one. John then said,and it really is a great relief,after 28 years of trying to be tough,you know trying to show them,I don't give a da*n and I'm this and I'm that,to be able to relax.and just be able to say,OK I'm no tough guy forget it.


Rena then said,I think in some funny way,I think girls even as children,have a greater lattitude because a little girl can be sort of frilly and feminine or she can be a tomboy and it's acceptable,but a little boy if he's not tossing that football,there's a lot of pressure on him.John said,there's a lot of pressure,not to show emotion,and he said that there was a lot of pressure on me not to be an artist,to be a chemist and he said he discussed this on another Mike Douglas episode.

Rena said that unfortunately some of the leaders in the Women's Liberation movement fall victim to being spokesmen,for Women's Lib, and yet at least in public personality they seem to really have a certain amount of contempt for the hair curled housewife and there is a kind of sneering contempt,and she said I think it's a measure of their own lack of liberation.And Yoko said it's snobbery,and Rena said yeah,they really don't like other women,but I'm sympathetic,and Mike Douglas then said a sexist woman-hating statement,saying,well women don't like other women period.Rena said,no see that's very unliberated and Yoko said, in response to what Mike Douglas said,that's not true,that's not true.And John said,you see they are brought up to compete with men.



Yoko said that even though in Japan they say they don't have much of a woman problem and women already had some liberation,there is still a long way to go that she really agrees with Rena that so many female liberation movement people basically hate women,and we have to first start to understand women and love them whether they are housewives or not,and she said that snobbery is very bad and we have to somehow find out a way to co-existing with men,and she asked Rena don't you think so and she said most definitely. George Carlin said,that actually many successful women are acting out male roles just like a lot of blacks think they escaped are acting out white roles.John also said that he thinks that women have to try twice as hard as to make it as men,and he said you know they have to be on their toes much more than a man.



On another Mike Douglas episode from the same week,former actress and acclaimed film maker Barbara Loden was on and Yoko had requested her as a guest.John asked her ,Did you have any problems working with the men,you know like giving them instructions and things like that and Barbara said,I did, but I think it was because I was afraid that they would not accept what I said,and I wasn't quite that authoritative in my own self.John said it's certainly a brave thing to do,and Yoko said it is.


Mike Douglas asked Yoko if John's attitude had changed much towards her since The Female Liberation Movement,and at first Yoko says John's attitude from the beginning was the same,and that they met on that level.John then says,twice, I was a male chauvinist and Yoko says,yes he was a male chauvinist but,and then John says,Can I say how you taught me,and Yoko says yes.John says,How I did it in my head was,would I ask Paul or George,or would I treat them the way I would treat a woman? John then said,it's a very simple thing maybe it's fetch that or do that ,and I started thinking if I said that to them,they'd say come on get it yourself,and if you put your wife or your girl friend in the position of your best friend,and say now would I say that to him,then you know when you're treading on some delicate feelings.



Mike Douglas said years later that after this week of John and Yoko co-hosting his show,many young people who had never watched his show before,(and his main audience was middle America and people older than their 20's and even mostly their 30's) told him they loved the show,and that it was great and his ratings went up high for those shows.Even if John didn't always live up to his feminist ideals and beliefs in his personal life,(although he did with Yoko because of her and this why and how he emotionally evolved into a caring,nurturing,house husband and father to Yoko and Sean),just the fact that he spoke out as a man in support of the feminist movement on a popular TV show back in early 1972 when most of the sexist male dominated woman-hating society looked down at it and considered it crazy which in some ways it's still unfortunately wrongly misunderstood(and it's really the male dominated,sexist,woman-hating society that has always been so wrong and crazy!),and the fact that John was (and still is) greatly admired and influential to many young people male and female,he did *a lot* to legitimize it and show it was rational,reasonable,needed and right!

A few months later he was performing Woman Is The Ni**er Of The World on The Dick Cavett Show and then months after that live in Madison Square Garden.In his very last radio interview done by Dave Sholin etc from RKO Radio just hours before he was tragically shot and killed, John said I'm more feminist now than I was when I sang Woman Is The N**ger,I was intellectually feminist then but now I feel as though at least I've put not my own money,but my body where my mouth is and I'm living up to my own preachings as it were.

He also said what is this BS men are this way, women are that way,we're all human.He had also said that he comes from the macho school of pretense of course *all* men really are they are just too conditioned all of their lives to realize and admit it.And he said that men are trained to be like they are in the army,and that it's more like that in England but he knows it's this way over here too,he said that they are taught as boys and men don't react,don't feel,don't cry,and he said he thinks that's what screwed us all up and that he thinks it's time for a change.

Barbara Graystark of Newsweek interviewed John September 1980 and part of what she said to John is,You've come a long way from the man who wrote at 23,''Women should be obscene rather than heard.'' And she asks John how did this happen? And John said that he was a working-class macho guy who was used to being served and Yoko didn't buy that. John then said that from the day he met Yoko,she demanded equal time,equal space,equal rights. He said that he said to Yoko then,don't expect him to change in any way and don't impinge on his space. John said that Yoko said to him then she can't be here because there's no space where you are everything revolves around him and that she can't breath in that atmosphere. John then says in this interview that he's thankful to her for the (meaning feminist) education.

http://www.beatlesinterviews.org/db1980.0929.beatles.html



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RB
Jun 8, 2016 4:56pm

In reply to RB:

Mike Douglas also said to John and Yoko, You're both so different, you had such different childhoods. John said, it's incredible isn't it? Yoko said, Yes! Mike asked, What do you think has attracted you to each other? Yoko said, We're very similar. John then said, She came from a Japanese upper-middle class family. Her parents were bankers and all that jazz,very straight. He said they were trying to get her off with an ambassador when she was 18.You know, now is the time you marry the ambassador and we get all settled. I come from a an upper-working class family in Liverpool, the other end of the world. John then said, we met but our minds are so similar,our ideas are so similar. It was incredible that we could be so alike from different environments, and I don't know what it is, but we're very similar in our heads. And we look alike too!

Mike also asked John about his painful childhood,and how his father left him when he was 5,and John said how he only came back into his life when he was successful and famous(20 years later!),and John said he knew that I was living all those years in the same house with my auntie,but he never visited him.He said when he came back into his life all those years later,he looked after his father for the same amount of time he looked after him,about 4 years.




He also talked about how his beloved mother Julia,who encouraged his music by teaching him to play the banjo,got hit and killed by a car driven by an off duty drunk cop when John was only 17 and just getting to have a relationship with her after she had given him away to be raised by her older sister Mimi when he was 5.


And John also said,And in spite of all that,I still don't have a hate-the-pigs attitude or hate-cops attitude.He then said, I think everybody's human you know,but it was very hard for me at that time,and I really had a chip on my shoulder,and it still comes out now and then,because it's a strange life to lead .He then said,But in general ah,I've got my own family now ...I got Yoko and she made up for all that pain.



John's psychologist Dr. Arthur Janov told Mojo Magazine in 2000( parts of this interview is on a great UK John Lennon fan site,You Are The Plastic Ono Band) that John had as much pain as he had ever seen in his life,and he was a psychologist for at least 18 years when John and Yoko saw him in 1970! He said John was a very dedicated patient. He also said that John left therapy too early though and that they opened him up,but didn't get a chance to put him back together again and Dr. Janov told John he need to finish the therapy,he said because of the immigration services and he thought Nixon was after him,he said we have to get out of the country.John asked if he could send a therapist to Mexico with him,and Dr. Janov told him we can't do that because they had too many patients to take care of,and he said they cut the therapy off just as it started really,and we were just getting going.

Also this great article by long time anti-sexist,anti-men's violence,anti-pornography former all star high school football player and author of the great,important 2006 book,The Macho Paradox:How Some Men Hurt Women and How All Men Can Help, Jackson Katz.John Lennon on Fatherhood,Feminism,and Phony Tough Guy Posturing http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jackson-katz/john-lennon-on-fatherhood_b_800333.html

Also Cynthia Lennon is quoted in the great John Lennon biography Lennon,by award winning music journalist and former editor of The Melody Maker Magazine and good friend of John's for 18 years,Ray Coleman as saying somethings like she knew as soon as she saw John and Yoko together she knew that she lost him,and that it was a meeting of the minds and that she knew that they were right for each other.She also said that she told John before he started his relationship with Yoko that she sees and incredible similarity between him and Yoko and said to him that there is something about her that is just like you.She told him that he may say that she's this crazy avant garde artist and that he's not interested in her,but that she can see more into John's future with Yoko then he can.

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 4:58pm

In reply to RB:



In this January 1971 interview with Red Mole John says that Yoko was well into liberation before he met her and that she had to fight her way through a man's world and he said the art world is completely dominated by men and said so Yoko was full of revolutionary zeal when they met. Then John said there was never any question about it that they had to have a 50-50 relationship or there was no relationship and he said he was quick to learn and he said that Yoko did an article in Nova more than two years back in which she said Woman is the Ni**er of the world. A year later he co-wrote with Yoko the song Woman Is The N*gger of The World,and bravely performed it live on The Dick Cavett show and at Madison Square Garden in 1972 and the song was banned off a lot of radio stations.


John also says in this same interview that it's very subtle how you're taught male superiority.

http://www.beatlesinterviews.org/db1971.0121.beatles.html

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Jun 8, 2016 5:08pm

Even Paul has said through the years including in the 1982 Music Express interview I lined to, that he thinks John meeting Yoko was the best thing to happen to him for his personal happiness.

And I have seen many pictures and video interviews of Yoko when she was younger and she looked very attractive and with no make up on,and Scavullo who was one of the best fashion and celebrity photographers took a glamorous beautiful black and white portrait of Yoko with eye make up on and her hair done fancy and it's on her biography on The All Music Guide online. And Yoko looks more attractive at almost 83 than a lot of young people! And she's always been very intelligent too.

She looks beautiful as quite a few people said, as a young woman here with no make up on her Instagram page,https://instagram.com/p/zAeIgqjzuH/?taken-by=yokoonoofficia Also as quite a few peole say here Yoko looked really beautiful here in 1981 accepting the grammy award for John and her album Double Fantasy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gpdRp0vVWK4

Also I once spoke to a former radio DJ who was now a manager of a CD store,and he told me that he was the one who went to Yoko's New York apartment in 1983 to do a very long interview with her by another DJ who hosted a great popular 2 hour Breakfast With The Beatles Sunday radio show. I asked him what was Yoko like and he said that she was a very nice lady.

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 5:10pm

And Cynthia Lennon said through the years that she would always be in love with John and she was married three times after him.

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 5:15pm

John Lennon said in his very last radio interview (just hours before he was so cruelly, insanely shot and killed by a crazy,horrible piece of sh*t who used to be a big Beatles fan since he was a teenager, and John was his favorite Beatle) that like most young men he was more involved with his career than with his children,and he said he regretted not spending enough time with Julian. He also said that he and Julian would have a relationship in the future but sadly they both were deprived of this.


And John didn't do the same horrible thing to Julian that his father did to him. John's father literally totally abandoned him and literally didn't see, or talk to John from the time he was 5,until he was a successful famous 24 year old.John did see Julian sometimes, and spoke with him on the phone and sent him post cards,birthday and Christmas cards and presents and he bought Julian a guitar when he was 11 as a Christmas present. John's father never did any of these things and John said it was like his father was dead.

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 5:18pm

Ozzy Osbourne has been a big Beatles fan since he was an early teenager,and he picked She Loves You as one of his favorite songs for Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest songs and Sgt.Pepper is one o his favorite albums. He says that not loving The Beatles is like not loving oxygen and he called The Beatles the greatest band to ever walk the earth.

Here Ozzy Osbourne says that he doesn't anyone will ever be as great as The Beatles and he said they were all great,even George Harrison and Ringo Starr were great.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FD0_MtCDcQQ


Here is a video of Ozzy Osbourne meets Paul McCartney for the first time and they hug each other.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkudA0P27Q0



Here Ozzy Osbourne says how hearing She Loves You at age 15 inspired him to go into music.


http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/entertainment/news/ozzy-osbourne-beatles-moved-me-30320049.html

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Jun 8, 2016 5:19pm

Also, classical composer Leonard Bernstein called John and Paul the greatest composers of the 20th century so did Elton John on a 1991 CBS Morning news show,he was asked who he musically admires and he said you can talk about your Rogers and Hammerstein but for the quanity of quality songs that Lennon and McCartney wrote in that short period of time,he said he thinks they were the greatest song writers of the 20th century.Brian Wilson said this too on a 1995 Nightline Beatles tribute show. The Beatles are in the Vocal Hall of Fame and John and Paul have been in the song writing Hall of Fame since 1987,Keith Richards and Mick Jagger have been in it since 1993,but as of now no members of The Who,or Led Zeppelin are in The Song Writing Hall Of Fame or The Vocal Hall Of Fame,The Rolling Stones aren't in The Vocal Hall of Fame either and The Beatles were awarded about 20 prestigious Ivor Novello awards as great singers and song writers in just a remarkable 8 year recording career,John and Paul won the first one in early 1964.


They also won an Oscar for their film score of their 1970 film Let It Be.

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RB
Jun 8, 2016 5:22pm

And I have been a huge Beatles fan, especially a big highly impressed John and Paul fan since I was 11 and I got my first Beatles book for my 11th birthday,I started collecting their albums at age 9, and I had every album by age 13. I was born after 1964 too. when I was 13 a guy at school who was 2 years older than me,gave me Hunter Davies authorized biography,he was a fan and his older brother was an even bigger fan.I would read that book for hours till 5 in the morning.

Most people I have known all of my life,including my female and male cousins,and neighbors and friends know they were brilliant.When I was 11 I had a music teacher who asked us to guess who he was talking about when he said they were geniuses and that they wrote 200 songs,and that most of their songs and albums are great and critically acclaimed in just an 8 year recording career,and I said,The Beatles and he said yes that's right!

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Jun 9, 2016 9:29am

In reply to RB:

No one cares

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Sue
Jun 9, 2016 11:04am

In reply to RB:

RB: Beatles fans like you are both embarrassing and terrifying.

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I me mine
Jun 9, 2016 8:41pm

The Beatles were the Beatles , Lennon is Lennon , McCartney is McCartney . Leave it .

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Turdmeon
Jun 12, 2016 3:45pm

Neil Innes is the best Beatle. By the way, George Martin said the Lennon had "great ideas" and Paul "great songs". I think that settles it.

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ted anran
Jul 4, 2016 6:43pm

This all sounds like favorite son stuff, the fact is John and Paul were more alike than that,they've always called Paul the favorite, it's nothing new, But the fact is John's personal style and integrity elevated the Beatles more than eager beaver Paul. besides it was psychedlic London in Carnaby street with Brian Jones and Moroccan medicine music, EVERY eager scenester was into the Avant Garde back then, including Beatle Paul and possibly a Hare Krishna or two. I'm sure he doesn't bother asking his PEERS who's the BEST Beatle, they'll be all sheepish grins

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Ted Anran
Jul 4, 2016 6:52pm

In reply to ted anran:

Without John in the Beatles, Paul would be considered a sissy.

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cry for no one
Jul 9, 2016 3:49pm

I've never really understood the whole territorial affiliation of Beatles members. Even more stupid is the way that this crosses over onto the music. Irrespective of whether you prefer John or Paul as personalities that most of you have never met, it shouldn't effect the appreciation of their musicianship. Inevitably, the sands of time offer the chance for a more objective perspective and since Paul is well over the hill now he will of course be seen as a great, equal but different to John, and not just a fool on the hill, even by those who ferociously defend John, for whatever reasons they do.

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cry for no one
Jul 9, 2016 3:53pm

In reply to Sue:

i think he may have deep, serious mental issues.

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Christopher
Jul 10, 2016 2:13am

The Best Beatle is Yoko, by a considerable distance.

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Christopher
Jul 10, 2016 2:13am

The Best Beatle is Yoko, by a considerable distance.

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LouAnn
Jul 10, 2016 1:46pm

In reply to Christopher :

Saying that "Yoko was the best Beatle" is about as interesting as saying "Wings were the band the Beatles could have been." Meaning: It's not at all interesting. Yoko is a lovely woman whose reputation in music was utterly overblown by her marriage to Lennon, which is, of course, why she sought out a relationship with a Beatle. She is the world's most successful performance artist and an expert at marketing herself. But musically? Minor figure who benefitted from her association with a Beatle.
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There really is no such thing as a "best" Beatle. Except of course for Pete Best. :) But the alchemy that produced both the great music and the global fame required all four of them (plus folks like Epstein and George Martin. Your favorite Beatle isn't the same thing as "best Beatle."
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What has finally (FINALLY!) started to happen is that the bullshit St. Lennon myth has receded. And more and more people now know that McCartney was every bit the genius that Lennon was -- and in many ways, Paul was the driving force behind the band from Revolver on. McCartney still of course takes a beating (thanks to the press and Lennon's own careful manipulation of the press) but that's happening less and less. Lennon needed to be taken down a few pegs (which isn't the same thing as dissing him -- it's just suggesting his role/importance in the Beatles was vastly overstated for decades), and McCartney, Harrison, and Starr needed to be raised up a few. That's just finally giving an accurate picture of their various contribution to a wonderful band that produced music that continues to resonate (obviously given the 1 billion streams their music has gotten in the 6 months its been on streaming services).
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McCartney's solo work is both the best and the worst of the four ex-Beatles. Sure Harrison's All Things Must Pass is a great album but Harrison really just kept reissuing the same album over and over in his solo career. And Lennon was just as repetitive after Plastic Ono Band and Imagine. Nothing conveys McCartney's importance in the Beatles more than Lennon's musically dull solo career. And of course nothing convey's Lennon's importance in the Beatles more than McCartney's worst solo work. McCartney -- no doubt affected by his massive pot consumption -- truly produced some dreadful lyrics. What's fascinating about his work is that he also produced some incredible lyrics, too. Paul's best solo work -- Ram, McCartney & McCartney 2, Band on the Run, Tug of War, Chaos and Creation, Electric Arguments, New -- is massively interesting and diverse. So while I don't think there is a Best Beatle, I do think there is a best Solo Beatle, and it's Paul.

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LouAnn
Jul 10, 2016 2:02pm

In reply to Ted Anran:

"Without John in the Beatles, Paul would be considered a sissy."
--
Seriously? You really want to go there? We're in 2016 and you're still repeating cliches about male sexuality and masculinity from the 1950s?

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Simon
Jul 11, 2016 12:48pm

In reply to Alexander:

It's not my favourite by any stretch of the imagination but bar the vocal, 'Silly Love Songs' is quite a passable Al Green pastische; much as 'Maxwell's Silver Hammer' would have received far less opprobrium had it been written and performed by Nilsson circa his first album

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Ted Anran
Jul 15, 2016 6:20am

In reply to LouAnn:

It's the same with Elvis, without Johnny Cash he'd be considered the same. No hard edge. Remember mullet Paul? I don't see John sporting a mullet in any pictures! Sorry, my point is valid. And the author of this is a weepy schoolgirl.

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LouAnn
Jul 16, 2016 1:03pm

In reply to Ted Anran:

"Sissy"? "Weepy schoolgirl?"
--
People like you who are so obsessed with questioning the masculinity of other men are usually just bullies worried about their own masculinity. Says more about you more than about Elvis or Paul.

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Paul Ramon
Jul 18, 2016 2:56am

In reply to Tim:

This comment is pretty close to my own. I'm Carrying is a beautiful song - and the conceit of it, that if he appears to "lack a sense of style" it's only because the flower in his jacket is obscured by the thing he's carrying for the listener of the song, so simple and complex and the same time. It's that think he does in Let Em In, say, where it's just beautifully simple - why I love The Beach Boys album "Friends" so much. P.S. I love Morse Moose, too.

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andrew brown
Jul 21, 2016 2:10pm

In you dreams old son.. Paul McCartney has spent so many years trying to prove himself as a solo artist.. "how do you sleep at nights" must haunt him.

I must confess that I haven't heard all his work since he left the Beatles because I kept passing out from boredom and banging my head on the desk or counter where I was sitting.

I would agree with rating Maybe I'm Amazed and Temporary Secretary as his best two songs.. and Maybe I'm Amazed as the only song that Paul McCartney ever wrote after leaving the Beatles that would qualify as being as good as any of the Beatles songs.

You totally dismiss all of John Lennon's work from the point that the Beatles were disbanded.. his first album with the Plastic Ono Band (a concept that would be later adopted by other bands such as Blur) allowed him to vent his anger and do totally Un-Beatle material..along with an apology for the Beatles break up.

It was a beautiful album and showed John's full range of vocal ability.

After that we have "Imagine".. which held RAM off the number one spot in the charts for as long as it was necessary... John was asked in an interview how his work would be compared to that of the Beatles.. he said that in 200 years time there would be no difference.. this may have been bravod on his part.. but "Imagine" would take on any Beatle song and win... and his Christmas record "so this is Christmas" is the biggest selling Christmas song of all time...Bing Crosby held that title for a very long time, but John Lennon took that away from him... our friend Paul McCartney
tried to write a Christmas song too... but sadly it didn't sell very well.

John also gave us "instant karma" "Give peace a chance" "nobody told me about like these"... all of which are innovative at a level that Paul McCartney is totally incapable of... he has recently adopted his former Beatle mop-head, dyed to an appropriate colour and was seen on Jule's show in a quasi beatle suit.. I guess he looks nice for the viewers .. "ooh he's 74 and he doesn't look a day over 60"

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Sue
Aug 21, 2016 1:01pm

In reply to andrew brown:

Andrew: Funny how you fall into the same trap as this author -- having to badmouth one Beatle in order to boost your favorite. (Hint: They were both brilliant and also sometimes produced weak work.) But I didn't get much past your line "I must confess that I haven't heard all his work since he left the Beatles ..."
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Why should anyone keep reading your post when you haven't listened to McCartney's solo work and so don't know what you are talking about?
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P.S. Ram is a timeless masterpiece and runs circles around the very dated-sounding Imagine. Plastic Ono Band is John's great album.

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