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Baker's Dozen

Dr. Manhattan: Jeffrey Lewis' Favourite Comics
Aug Stone , December 15th, 2015 10:22

Aug Stone talks to the NYC musician and comic book creator about bizarre autobiographies, superheroes and (SPOILER) a whole lot of Alan Moore, as he finishes his UK tour in support of new album, Manhattan

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Alan Moore - V For Vendetta
In some ways, V For Vendetta is a better comic than Watchmen. The art is probably better, it's a little more politically sharp, and it's more interesting from an emotional perspective. In that sense, it's better than Watchmen, but for the reasons that I said before, the fact that Watchmen is so irredeemably pulpy, that to me is why Watchmen is a better or more interesting artistic piece, because it has it both ways. Plus Watchmen has more going on in terms of the layers of the narrative and the little pieces of the puzzle that you're allowed to fit together in your own creative ways as a reader. V For Vendetta doesn't have that game complexity to it, the way that Watchmen is like playing a game as you're reading. V For Vendetta is just a really well written story with incredible art and a depth to the perspective that you don't really find in a lot of other comics, especially at that time. But the flaws of something like V For Vendetta or Miracleman are that he wrote them as two different Alan Moores. There's the chapters that he wrote in the early '80s in the first part of his career and then he finished the stories in the late '80s as a much different writer than he was a few years earlier. So V For Vendetta doesn't have the kind of consistency that some of his other works do, and it suffers a little from that. But still nobody could make a list of the ten greatest comics of all time and not include V For Vendetta. Probably half the greatest comics of all time are Alan Moore comics; at least three of them are. And that's an achievement that still hasn't been topped.


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Rockin' Rom
Dec 15, 2015 11:32am

Great selections, eloquent descriptions. I haven't thought about Rom the Spaceknight in years, I must be a similar age to Lewis I guess, how I loved that comic.

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Jeff
Dec 15, 2015 7:46pm

The world of comics is extremely dense with amazing work, and has been for decades... but Alan Moore is one of those writers where, if somebody asked me about the single best author in the medium, it would be a no-brainer. Miracleman, Swamp Thing, and Watchmen alone... and that's ignoring a LOT. Those are my "big 3" from him.

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Ott
Dec 15, 2015 9:58pm

Very well written, great insights.

Do any of you know the book "Flicker's Fleas"? (http://www.amazon.com/Flickers-fleas-Ken-Struck/dp/B0006RXSA6)

I picked this up in early '00 in Tallinn Estonia, in a local comics shop. A completely bonkers story of a heroin addicted saxophone player, who has inherited a flea sircus. Wierdly delirious and a paranoid book.

I was just wondering if any of you has ever heard of it, or knows anything about it?

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Scott
Dec 16, 2015 12:39pm

Love Peepshow, one of my all-time favourite comics, great to see it mentioned here.

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Grimbo
Dec 17, 2015 7:32pm

In reply to Jeff:

Those are all fantastic, but I would add "From Hell" to that list. "Swamp Thing" is a gorgeous series, though.

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danlor
Apr 5, 2016 2:12pm

I'm always amazed at not finding these lists filled with 2000AD stuff, particularly Dredd. As far as I'm concerned Dredd is the best comics character ever made, and 2000AD by itself can easily compete, in terms of quality, with the entire American industry. It almost never gets a mention tho.

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