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Baker's Dozen

Girls Don't Cry: Rumer's Favourite Albums
Simon Price , December 3rd, 2014 15:46

Platinum-selling MOR singer Rumer is back with her third album, Into Colour. She tells Simon Price about her Baker's Dozen of inspirational LPs

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Dionne_1417621147_resize_460x400

Dionne Warwick - Dionne
Dionne's a really hard album to find information about, because I don't think it was that successful, which is a tragedy. It isn't even on Spotify. But I bought it. Everything is conducted, arranged and orchestrated by Burt Bacharach, so it was a completely Burt-controlled thing. For Hal David and Burt Bacharach, she was the one they were writing for. It was her voice, that perfect blend of soulful but delicate and restrained, that appealed to everybody. She's just a natural musician-singer. She's a singer with artistry. She's always been prolific, and she'd done a load of albums before this. It didn't chart, but it's just beautiful.

They're not all Bacharach and David songs. There's 'Love Song', the song by the British songwriter Lesley Duncan that Elton John did as well. 'Hasbrook Heights' is my favourite - I actually recorded it for Into Colour as a duet with Dionne, and it's going out on the Japanese version. We did it live together at the Royal Albert Hall, and her fans were geeking out a little, saying, 'She's never done this one live before.' This is like the Barbra album in that they're both singers who are interpreters of catalogue, but what they're really excellent at is picking a tune. It was Dionne who encouraged Stevie Wonder to put out 'I Just Called To Say I Love You' from The Woman In Red's soundtrack as a single. Great singers have an ear for a song, and that's why Bacharach and David were hanging on Dionne's every word. Because if Dionne didn't like it, it wasn't a good vibe. They wanted her to like it. They were trying to impress her. Dionne is an album for people who want to enjoy sophisticated, thoughtful Dionne Warwick. It sounds like she picked the songs.


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Joe
Dec 3, 2014 6:42pm

I get what she's saying with Oasis and the pub. But I'm pretty sure she's missing the point a bit with that Manics lyric.

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GRIM
Dec 4, 2014 10:46am

In reply to Joe:

of course, when Manics released Everything Must Go, loads of those Oasis fans latched onto Manics, for entirely the wrong reasons. They thought they the band were speaking with them, when they were speaking about them.
But then you can't get away from the fact that for a few years, at the end of brit-pop, they became a massive arena/stadium band, with the anthem and lyrics that many weren't really listening to.

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johnnym
Dec 4, 2014 6:14pm

Oasis is kleptomania, theft of songs. Gary Glitter himself took time off from episodes of child molestation to sue Oasis over the opening song to Rumer's beloved What's The Story. He won - check the writing credits. And when the Rutles sue you - and, again, WIN! - you're a joke. These are lucky millionaires, nothing more...

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Asunderground
Dec 4, 2014 6:54pm

"everyone's doing coke and everyone's doing pills. I'm in a druggy little town, going nowhere, and there are a lot of drugs". So was there a lot of drugs?

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Asunderground
Dec 4, 2014 7:03pm

The notion that Oasis we're 'subversive' is hilarious. They were the epicentre of pedestrian new-lad culture. They were the ultimate terrace-anthem band. In all fairness they did subvert. Not in a culturally useful way like punk did. More in that they massively commodified 'indie', did untold proxy damage to the uk music press and introduced an unwanted thuggishness to the music scene.

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Dec 4, 2014 9:57pm

i love her story about the bass played not liking astral weeks. she's funny and human too.lovely

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Dec 5, 2014 9:24am

That's a nice list, by the way.

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Tony_Badgers
Dec 5, 2014 1:07pm

Stephen Bishop looks like a dude.

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Monty
Dec 7, 2014 5:20am

Finally, Cat Power gets the recognition she so deserves.

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Matt Raindrop
Dec 9, 2014 5:51pm

'Seeds of Memory' by Terry Reid is a lovely, lovely album. Good to see it get a mention

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Rumer
Dec 10, 2014 7:34pm

I wish to point out an innaccuate quote
I did not produce the album by myself. Steve Brown
produced the album with me sat next to him but! Slow,
I produced more by myself, with steve taking a back seat
on the sessions as he didn't understand what I meant by " cosmic"
On the tape recorder I was talking about Slow not the album but things
get lost on tape. While Steve and I don't speak and haven't spoken for two years I
wish to be clear that he not only produced the album but he paid for it upfront
So he was very cool at the time and I don't wish to re invent history and mischaracterise his massive contribution . Thanks!

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Oliver
Jan 9, 2015 6:40pm

In reply to Joe:

Agreed.

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Afro Zen
Mar 4, 2015 11:43pm

Danny Thompson on Astral Weeks?

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