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Baker's Dozen

Girls Don't Cry: Rumer's Favourite Albums
Simon Price , December 3rd, 2014 15:46

Platinum-selling MOR singer Rumer is back with her third album, Into Colour. She tells Simon Price about her Baker's Dozen of inspirational LPs

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Stephen Bishop - Blue Guitars
What I love about Stephen Bishop is his unusual sense of melody. And he's just a phenomenal songwriter. He wrote 'Separate Lives', he wrote 'Save It For A Rainy Day', he wrote 'On And On', [starts singing] 'Down in Jamaica, they got lots of pretty women/ Steal your money, then they break your heart...' I've got a funny story about that, actually. He was at a party and Rita Marley was there and she came up to him and said, 'What's all this stuff about Jamaican women stealing your money?' And she really got in his face. And he was like, 'Listen Rita, I've never been to Jamaica! It's just a song! I made it up!' And he was so scared he ran away and hid in the kitchen for the rest of the night.

He's become a really good friend of mine. He co-wrote four songs on my new album and we'll probably keep writing songs together. Blue Guitars is a 1994 record, which was produced by Andrew Gold, and it feels to me like an Andrew Gold and Stephen Bishop record, because you can hear the relationship. It's completely different to what he normally does. They were really good friends, it was produced at Andrew Gold's house in California, and when you listen to it, it sounds like friendship. You can hear the friendship, and that's the most beautiful thing. But I couldn't decide between Blue Guitars and Bish. The album Bish is a big budget studio album, it's got Steve Cropper on it, Chaka Khan, great people. There's a picture of them all, I think they're called the Bishettes. It sounded like a real happening. What's weird about it, and probably why it wasn't successful, is that it's got these interludes from The Wizard Of Oz. He's done it as a sort of tribute to Yip Harburg, guy who wrote all the lyrics to 'Somewhere Over The Rainbow', 'Ding! Dong! The Witch Is Dead', etc, and is really responsible for that film being what it was. Every now and then on Bish, it goes, 'If I only had a brain...' Also, there's a song on there with Art Garfunkel on backing vocals, and I said to Stephen, 'I can't hear him, he's really quiet. Why is that?' And he said 'Oh, that's a really stupid story. Once, Art Garfunkel asked me to sing on one of his songs, and he turned me down in the mix. So I did the same to him.' It's so childish, and of course now he thinks that was really stupid. Art Garfunkel covers a lot of his songs. Art Garfunkel is probably his biggest fan.


Joe
Dec 3, 2014 6:42pm

I get what she's saying with Oasis and the pub. But I'm pretty sure she's missing the point a bit with that Manics lyric.

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GRIM
Dec 4, 2014 10:46am

In reply to Joe:

of course, when Manics released Everything Must Go, loads of those Oasis fans latched onto Manics, for entirely the wrong reasons. They thought they the band were speaking with them, when they were speaking about them.
But then you can't get away from the fact that for a few years, at the end of brit-pop, they became a massive arena/stadium band, with the anthem and lyrics that many weren't really listening to.

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johnnym
Dec 4, 2014 6:14pm

Oasis is kleptomania, theft of songs. Gary Glitter himself took time off from episodes of child molestation to sue Oasis over the opening song to Rumer's beloved What's The Story. He won - check the writing credits. And when the Rutles sue you - and, again, WIN! - you're a joke. These are lucky millionaires, nothing more...

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Asunderground
Dec 4, 2014 6:54pm

"everyone's doing coke and everyone's doing pills. I'm in a druggy little town, going nowhere, and there are a lot of drugs". So was there a lot of drugs?

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Asunderground
Dec 4, 2014 7:03pm

The notion that Oasis we're 'subversive' is hilarious. They were the epicentre of pedestrian new-lad culture. They were the ultimate terrace-anthem band. In all fairness they did subvert. Not in a culturally useful way like punk did. More in that they massively commodified 'indie', did untold proxy damage to the uk music press and introduced an unwanted thuggishness to the music scene.

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Dec 4, 2014 9:57pm

i love her story about the bass played not liking astral weeks. she's funny and human too.lovely

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Dec 5, 2014 9:24am

That's a nice list, by the way.

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Tony_Badgers
Dec 5, 2014 1:07pm

Stephen Bishop looks like a dude.

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Monty
Dec 7, 2014 5:20am

Finally, Cat Power gets the recognition she so deserves.

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Matt Raindrop
Dec 9, 2014 5:51pm

'Seeds of Memory' by Terry Reid is a lovely, lovely album. Good to see it get a mention

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Rumer
Dec 10, 2014 7:34pm

I wish to point out an innaccuate quote
I did not produce the album by myself. Steve Brown
produced the album with me sat next to him but! Slow,
I produced more by myself, with steve taking a back seat
on the sessions as he didn't understand what I meant by " cosmic"
On the tape recorder I was talking about Slow not the album but things
get lost on tape. While Steve and I don't speak and haven't spoken for two years I
wish to be clear that he not only produced the album but he paid for it upfront
So he was very cool at the time and I don't wish to re invent history and mischaracterise his massive contribution . Thanks!

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Oliver
Jan 9, 2015 6:40pm

In reply to Joe:

Agreed.

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Afro Zen
Mar 4, 2015 11:43pm

Danny Thompson on Astral Weeks?

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