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Baker's Dozen

Rites Of Passage: The Haxan Cloak's Favourite Heavy Metal Albums
John Doran , August 28th, 2014 04:21

Bobby Krlic may well be primarily known as an electronic music producer, but he grew up a heavy metal obsessive. As commissioned by Kevin Martin as part of our Bug Week, he tells John Doran about the 13 metal albums he loved the most when he was young

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"When I got offered the chance to produce I Shall Die Here for The Body, it was a surprise even to me really. I'd been aware of their stuff for a while and when Christs, Redeemers, their album for Thrill Jockey, came out, it seemed to ruffle a few feathers. Then Matt Werth who runs RVNG Intl. got in touch and said they'd been discussing collaborators for the new record and my name came up. I just jumped at it. They paid for me to go over to the Mexican Summer studios in Brooklyn. It was a bit of a whirlwind experience for me because it was the first time I'd ever been to America, and I'd always wanted to go ever since I was a kid. But I spent my entire time in the studio working on the album. It was really exciting and a good experience but really hectic as well. I've never actually met them in person. It was the first record I'd ever produced for someone else, so I said, 'If it's cool with you, my production style is that I'd like to get a vibe for the songs and be left on my own.' A lot of the work I was going to be doing was inside a computer and there's nothing worse than someone looking over your shoulder when you're tweaking shit for hours on end. Luckily they just said, 'Here's the stems, just get on with it.'

"I also did a Latitudes Session called The Men Parted The Sea To Devour The Water - for Southern Records. And this is 100% the background I'm from. I've always been into a wide breadth of music but ever since I was eight or nine, metal and punk have informed everything I do. I was in bands making punk music maybe up until a few years ago. And I find it a bit frustrating really that some people think that I am a fucking DJ... really it's the complete polar opposite of what I do. And if you listen closely I think you can hear the heavy metal influences in the two albums I've put out. Aesthetically heavy metal plays a big role in The Haxan Cloak, and I think the fact that I put my first album out on Aurora Borealis says something. That was a really conscious decision. I targeted them with demos more than anything else. Well, them and Southern. Southern were and still are a really important label, and instrumental in putting out the music that I grew up listening to, so it was kind of a dream come true to do anything associated with them.

"There are a couple of reasons why I plumped for these particular albums which I was mainly listening to when I was a teenager. I do read a lot of these lists of people's favourite records and they can be a bit like when you go round to someone's house and they have a load of classic books on display which they've clearly never read. That sort of thing really pisses me off because I don't think it's genuine. If you ask me what my 13 favourite metal records are this is what I have to say, because metal's been so instrumental to me and my growth. Metal has shaped me musically and this list reflects the importance of that period between the age of 10 and 17 when you're just soaking everything up and I just wanted to be really honest about that.  

"I got into the metal look when I was younger and I guess there were two sides to that. When I was a teenager it was skate shirts and massive baggy shorts and chains and shit like that. But then after a couple of years you realise you look like a complete tit so you try and reign it in a bit, and that was when I started to raid all of my brother's old clothes, so I'd nick his denim jackets and old Metallica T-shirts and stuff like that and go skating. I had this 1980s thrash metal skater thing going on."

To find out what Bobby's favourite heavy metal albums are click on the picture below…

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DergFace
Aug 28, 2014 10:30am

i think i respect haxon cloak less after looking at this list :(

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Aug 28, 2014 10:44am

In reply to DergFace:

So what was little Dergie listening to when he was 8 years old?

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teegee
Aug 28, 2014 11:41am

Tom Morello making "'his guitar sound like Turntables'" sounded really stupid back in 1991, never mind now. My Bloody Valentine making guitars sound like a bunch of mating whales, was more subversive in my 91.

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Aug 28, 2014 12:02pm

In reply to teegee:

Unfortunately I was 5 years-old in 91, so subversive whales weren't really top of the list for me

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Aug 28, 2014 12:31pm

As someone who grew up listening to my older brother's cds of sepultura, metallica, pantera and all the usual bunch, aged 10, I can relate.

Man those were the days! listening to a new album and feeling the whole adrenalin rush...how many times did that happen to you recently? yeah, me too.

I feel as though the Rage against the machine album is more actual than ever, up there with the system of a down one.
actually I'm gonna fire them up again now.

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Aug 28, 2014 1:05pm

i can relate to the haxan cloak's list. as a person who started listening to metal (metal of all kinds of denominations, including the cheesy ones) at a younger age, i suppose you'd have to start somewhere. gotta say that Toxicity still gets the blood pumpin' after all these years.

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renrag
Aug 28, 2014 1:24pm

In reply to DergFace:

Yeah, kids are dumb, right.

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Asunderground
Aug 28, 2014 3:34pm

Can people please stop saying 'heavy metal'. It makes you sound like a radio 4 presenter talking about 'young peoples' music.

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Asunderground
Aug 28, 2014 3:34pm

It's just 'metal'.

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Gizzi_M
Aug 28, 2014 6:15pm

Totally get where he's coming from on this list. Rage, Pantera, Guns all played a huge role in me getting into Metal in the early 90's. I would have added Sepultura's Chaos AD and Faith No More's Angeldust as well.

If you haven't heard the Body record he produced it is totally brilliant. Would love him to hook up with more Metal artists.

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Billiam
Aug 28, 2014 6:32pm

Well this certainly opened my eyes to some metal albums I haven't heard before like "Appetite for Destruction". Also he wasn't listening to Bathory when he was young with a list like that the dweeb.

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Dippin
Aug 28, 2014 6:38pm

In reply to DergFace:

Yep.

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Aug 28, 2014 8:11pm

..bad

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George Got?
Aug 28, 2014 9:09pm

That was an interesting list. Had me from the beginning but all the nu metal albums kinda threw me off, then it ends with Thrones which was really awesome. Joe Preston is a fucking legend. Not sure if he's a dick - maybe a bit lazy? Whatever. Decent list.

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Dames
Aug 28, 2014 10:42pm

In reply to DergFace:

Totally, Dergie. And it couldn't be Motley Crue, Maiden, Twisted Sister, Metal Church, Manowar etc could it? Has to be painfully cred. It's like someone citing yer basic 808 State, Detroit etc for 'Dance'...

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Aug 29, 2014 12:15am

In reply to Dames:

Wait... since when is nu metal "painfully cred"?

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Robin
Aug 29, 2014 6:14am

In reply to Dames:

Read the article. He's a child of the 90s therefore nu metal rather than 80s big hitters.

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John Doran
Aug 29, 2014 7:20am

Good to see the weekly invasion of drooling fucking imbeciles who can't read has happened again. It must be tough trying to understand features just by looking at the pictures...

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Adam
Aug 29, 2014 8:50am

In reply to John Doran:

Thanks John, your response made my day and it's not even 10am yet!

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Haxan Cloak
Aug 29, 2014 12:05pm

In reply to Billiam:

I wasn't trying to show you anything you hadn't heard before you fuck-end. I was stating a list of stuff I listened to in my formative years that influenced the sound that I make now. Or did you fail to notice that there's NO MODERN METAL ON THERE, you dumb-eyed fuck.

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winewolf
Aug 29, 2014 7:05pm

great list, I loved a lot of these albums 20 years ago (and still do). then john peel played girl/boy by aphex and things changed for me, but up until then a lot of these albums I punched the air to. I miss those days (punching the air and feeling the metal rush). fuck DergFace

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smallchurch
Aug 30, 2014 2:35am

re; Thrones', Joe Preston: he is a lovely bloke. 100% gentleman. Known him for years. Never fails to impress.

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itsownninfiniteflower
Aug 30, 2014 6:38am

Re: Joe Preston... very nice guy. He did an all synth Thrones set earlier this year that was fantastic.

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Gaz
Aug 31, 2014 4:08pm

Very entertaining. Good work Bobby!

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david frampton
Sep 3, 2014 4:39pm

great list!! respecting your vibe!

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Scryllexient
Sep 16, 2014 7:03pm

Obviously, no one's going to agree with all of Mr. Krlic's choices (because of course this is an admirably honest list of bands that influenced Krlic when he was very young). Still, the question should never be "how pure are the influences?" It should always be "what did the artist get from those influences and how did s/he use it?" Have you ever picked up and put down an instrument you thought wasn't worth playing, only to have some imaginative friend reach over and play the hell out of it? Well, influences can be like that, too. You can have a perfectly nuanced album collection and make music that suggests you haven't got any taste, while someone who worshiped Guns 'n' Roses in their boyhood can grow up to produce like a nightmare god.

Also: I hadn't even heard the Earth 2 album until reading the Haxan Cloak's list, so thanks for that.

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ZekeHop
Oct 3, 2015 11:30pm

Am I losing my mind, or are there only 12 here?

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