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Quietus Reissues, Compilations & Mixes Of 2012 So Far
John Doran , July 9th, 2012 08:33

Our favourite mixes, comps, archival releases, live albums, best-ofs and WTF anthologies from the first half of 2012

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As with The Quietus Albums Of The Year So Far 2012 feature, this isn't an attempt to somehow produce a definitive list, more to honestly reflect what we listen to and find interesting ourselves.

This list of reissues, live LPs, compilations, mix tapes, archive material, DJ sets and the like was voted for by Luke Turner, Rory Gibb and myself, after being issued with the really flimsy instruction: "Just try and list the stuff you've listened to the most."

It would be ridiculous trying to get into the relative merits of yet another reissue of The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars as compared to Midnight Cleaners by Cleaners From Venus, especially given how much Martin Newell owes David Bowie. But the bottom line here is as much as I love Bowie, I haven't been able to stop playing albums by Newell since reading Aug Stone's fascinating interview with him on this site and then investing in a bunch of LPs on Record Store Day. Again, it's worth restating that we think there are plenty of magazines and websites who do a very good job of analysing canonical albums in great depth, to such an extent that it would be pretty much pointless for us to spend too much time doing it. (That said we do have a very big, very well written feature on Ziggy coming up regardless!)

Instead we hope that, like us, you're thrilled by the idea of taking a chance on something new and untested. These charts always seem to divide people into two rough camps. Those that say, 'I haven't heard of any of these, you clowns' and those that say, 'I haven't heard of any of these, that's my listening sorted for a few more weeks.' The site isn't written for anyone specifically but we do recognise ourselves in the latter type of reader rather than the former.

It's a good job these things aren't supposed to be set in stone and I guess the nature of how transient and unreliable they are is reflected by the fact I'm sitting here kicking myself for not remembering to include Simian Mobile Disco's amazing Unpatterns long player in the albums chart last week. At least we can hopefully get some more people to listen to the absolutely stunning mix they made for us a couple of months ago. We also feel that this attitude leaves us free to say that we've already had our lives since last Monday brightened considerably by Beak's second album, the coder's nightmare, >> - which came out on the day of last week's chart but will no doubt be featuring high come the end of year, as well as Pegasvs by Pegasvs and Parthenon by Plvs Vltra.

Whereas we can be quite bolshy about new music, I feel less cocksure when it comes to reissues, meaning that, yes, I'm sure we have genuinely overlooked some gems. Please let us know what your favourites have been below. It's a given that by the end of the year, some of them will be our favourites as well.

Anyway, all I know is this, if I had the chance to take a few days off to lie on the couch to listen to every record on this list, I'd be very happy indeed. Well maybe "happy" is the wrong word to be applied to Regis or Dead Sound & Videohead but there isn't a release here that wouldn't make me feel a strong surge of emotion, which surely is what it's all about.

And as always, it wouldn't be a Quietus chart if it didn't feature an album from totally the wrong year. (It's Bitch Magnet's Umber this time but it so, so easily could have been Virgo Four's Resurrection.)

50. Catherine A.D. - Reprise - The Covers Collection

"I love it when it makes you feel nauseated or overwhelmed or you can feel it pulse through your skull. That's the kind of place I like to go to when I'm on stage..." Catherine A.D.

Read our interview with Catherine A.D. here

49. ROB - Make It Fast, Make It Slow

"ROB's 'Make It Fast, Make It Slow' appeared on Soundway's Ghana Soundz compilation, and apparently its popularity eventually inspired the label to reissue the LP in its entirety. It was a worthwhile venture indeed: originally recorded in 1977, the album expands on the stunning title track: a slow, sometimes dark and hallucinatory afro-funk odyssey." Rory Gibb

48. Soul Cal – Funky Disco & Modern Soul (1971 – 1982)

"I was very positive then. I always thought that things would get better. I'm still thinking that way. I still want to be a successful songwriter. That's never left my mind. You can't go wrong with inspirational music that makes you feel good and act right." Luther Davis, whose 'You Can Be A Star' was the inspiration for the Soul Cal box set

47. The Beat – I Just Can’t Stop It

"We wanted to be The Monkees with politics, a subversive Monkees, paying tribute to the great pop songwriting of the 60s but addressing current issues." Dave Wakeling

Read our interview with Dave Wakeling and Ranking Roger here

46. Suzanne Ciani – Lixiviation

"I don’t think you can work in electronic music without having an ear that can analyse what is going on in a sound. This is part of the problem with the newer generation who use samplers. They are given a palette of sounds that are already stuck so they never learn to alter those sounds. This is another reason for coming back to analogue." Suzanne Ciani

Read our interview with Suzanne Ciani here

45. Atomic Forest – Obsession

"The Voodoos were getting popular because of our appearance and showmanship. We dressed in uniforms, very flashy clothes. Suku would take us to the textile shops and buy loud coloured cloth from Bombay Dyeing, most of them were meant for curtains. We were set to play at the home of a famous film star. When we made our appearance we noticed that the curtains were the exact same material as our shirts. We headed out the backdoor and never played the gig." Madhukar Dhas

Read our interview with Atomic Forest here

44. The Body – The Body

"This world, our culture, and perhaps our entire civilisation are seemingly doomed to utter failure. I believe that things for humanity will be much worse before they will get better, if that is even a possibility. The idea of a bleak future, with or without people, is the predominant vision of our work; the idea of what is left behind after we have finished... if there is anything left behind." Chip King

Read our Interview with The Body

43. Penny Rimbaud – Acts Of Love

Watch the Quietus this week for an interview with Penny Rimbaud of CRASS

42. Qat, Coffee and Qambus - Raw 45s From Yemen

"Yemeni music exists on a continuum. Yemen appears to be one of the few colonized countries whose music, documented during the initial recording boom of the 20th Century, seems almost totally impervious to Western influence, despite the southern part of the country being occupied by the British up until the mid-60s." Chris Menist

41. The Quietus Mix 65 - Simian Mobile Disco

"No band should rest on their laurels and try and repeat what they've already done. You should always be looking forward and developing." Simian Mobile Disco

Listen to SMD's Trip The Light Fantastic Mix here

40. Andrew Weatherall – Masterpiece

"Dance stems from the need to transcend yourself... whether it's at a disco or in church." Andrew Weatherall

Watch our filmed interview with Andrew Weatherall here

39. Sonic Router Mix #114 - Peverelist

"Tom Ford reigned in the new year with a rare DJ mix gathering excellent new music from himself, Livity Sound collaborators Asusu and Kowton, Bass Clef and more. At the time I said: "With the mix featuring New York hero Levon Vincent, there's the sense here of a circle being closed, of the Bristolian house/techno sound slotting into a longer and deeper continuum that stretches further afield than UK rave history. It might remain halfstepped and initially challenging for a crowd raised on four-to-the-floor, but the composition, cleverness and composure here are top notch, and highlight exciting routes through the future of the space that's opened up post dubstep." Rory Gibb

Listen to Peverelist's mix here

38. The Human League – Dare

"I think the idea with the sleeve art was that you couldn’t really tell whether it was a man or a woman on the cover, that it was quite androgynous... but I know you could tell really.

Read our interview with The Human League here

37. Rob Booth - Electronic Explorations

"Priced at only £5, it was originally planned to include 30 tunes - already a great value package. However, this has now spiralled to a gigantic 61 brand new tracks from some of the most exciting and elusive artists on the electronic underground scene." Rob Booth

To buy the EE Compilation click here

36. Minny Pops - Standstill to Motion: Live at the Melkweg, 19-03-1981

"In truth, Minny Pops never intended to be a band at all. Preferable to them was the notion that they were some kind of art installation; a floating and transient (lots of members and direction changes) jumble of ideas. Yet in the end their sound became quite distinctive and stands apart from the secondary mush of the post-punk era." Mick Middles

Read our review of Standstill To Motion here

35. Luk Thung – Classic & Obscure 78s From The Thai Countryside

"Luk Thung is known to many as Thailand's 'country music'. It's a vibrant and syncretic genre of pop song which aimes to give voice to a disenfranchised rural population. Its history is inextricably lined to that of the nation at large, and it continues to provide a sountrack to the political turmoil that resounds in today's Thailand." Peter Doolan

34. The Heads – Radio Sessions

"If that’s not a freakout, I’m a Dutchman." John Peel on hearing 'Spliffriff' recorded for his show for the first time

Read our feature on The Heads here

33. Suede - Live At Royal Albert Hall

"It was for good reason that Kurt Cobain was often photographed wearing a Suede badge. He could see, unlike so many of his fans, that Suede were, at heart, exactly the same as Nirvana: a taut punk group who wrote incredible pop songs with a romantic, political edge." Luke Turner

Read our live review of Suede at the Royal Albert Hall here

32. Bitch Magnet - Umber

"Yeah, we know it came out last year. We just feel bad for not making more of a fuss about it at the time." John Doran

Read our feature on Bitch Magnet here

31. Pauline Oliveros - Reverberations: Tape & Electronic Music 1961-70

"Electronic music pioneer and creator of the concept of 'deep listening' Pauline Oliveros celebrated her 80th birthday this year, and to celebrate Important Records have released and reissued several of her records. This twelve disc set is the centrepiece, and it contains so much material it's faintly intimidating to get a handle on. But it contains some marvelous music: I'm particularly fond of the fluid explorations of the 'Mnemonics' series, whose wild squawks of interference whip up a storm of BBC-recalling sci-fi radiophonics." Rory Gibb

30. The Cure – Pornography

"It doesn’t matter if we all die” begins 'One Hundred Years', the opening track on Pornography, The Cure’s gothic piece de resistance. It is a laudably existential opening salvo for such an acid fuelled, sensuous and senseless gape into the void. A queasy, lurching guitar line snakes over hissing and processed post punk disco hi hats as the never-ending LSD conveyor belt keeps on trundling atrocities into view. There may be a fine line between idiocy and genius with this kind of angst ridden caper but Smith’s body horror and churning brain make this non-more compelling. “A sound like a tiger, thrashing in the water”? That’s living alright." John Doran

Read our Cure primer here

29. Peter Zummo & Arthur Russell - Zummo With An X

"Zummo With An X, originally recorded by Peter Zummo and the late Arthur Russell in 1985, was reissued this year by Optimo Music. There are shades of earlier generations of New York composers in the repeated blocks of melody of the seven Lateral Pass movements. But 20 minute B-side 'Song IV' is the highlight, a marvelous, slowly unspooling forest of cello, brass and tabla-esque percussion." Rory Gibb

28. Drexciya - Journey of the Deep Sea Dweller Vol. II

"The early works of Drexciya are stunning: their inseparable fusions of form, function and concept are some of the most involving and affecting in the entire electronic music canon. Many of their early electro tracks were brutally effective on a dancefloor, but wrapped that essential functionality within astonishingly rich mythology, compositional skill and textural detail." Ed Owen

Read our review of Vol. 1 here

27. Quietus Mix 57 - Dead Sound & Videohead

"Dead Sound & Videohead, two men who hail from Stoke On Trent, are the spearhead of the Perc assault, not only the hardest act on the label, but one of the most punishing artists in the UK today." Luke Turner

Listen to Dead Sound & Videohead's Nice To Mince You here

26. David Sylvian - A Victim of Stars

"It's hard looking back. It's not something I enjoy doing. And I initially thought it was detrimental to the production of new work. But ultimately it didn't prove to be the case because it really spurred me on to move away from what I'd done in the past." David Sylvian

Read our David Sylvian interview here

25. Various Artists - Shangaan Shake

"Shangaan dancers, they dance, they can go on for almost an hour with that speed (170bpm), without getting tired. When you see them dance you feel like they have got no bones." Nozinja

Read our review of Shangaan Shake here

24. WITCH - We Intend To Cause Havoc

"“The American/European musical influence in southern Africa was similar – especially because Zambia, Malawi and Zimbabwe were under the same colonial masters as Northern Rhodesia and Myasaland. These masters forced their imported culture on their subjects.” Emmanuel Kanga 'Jagari' Chanda

Read our review of We Intend To Cause Havoc here

23. Boban I Marko Markovic Orkestar – Golden Horns

22. Trevor Jackson – Metal Dance

"I started going to a night called Astral Flights in the early ’80s at The Embassy in the West End. Back in the day, Mick Jagger and Grace Jones would go there. There was this guy called DJ Wolf and he would play Alien Sex Fiend and then electro records and dub. I grew up listening to all different types of music, from new romantic electronic music, the more obvious things like The Human League, Soft Cell and Depeche Mode, to electro and hip hop." Trevor Jackson

Read our Trevor Jackson interview here

21. Cornershop – Urban Turban

Watch the Quietus this week for Tjinder Singh's Baker's Dozen.

20. Floating Points - Resident Advisor #301 Mix

"It's now archived, but Sam Shepherd's mix for RA sums up the breadth of his dancefloor interests in nearly two hours of disco, house, funk and current post-dubstep music. Impeccably mixed, energetic and compulsively replayable, it offers a window into the wide array of influences that unite to make his own music so distinctive." Rory Gibb

19. Catherine Christer Hennix & The Chora(s)san Time Court Mirage - Live At The Grimm Museum Volume 1

"Most listeners won't be clued into CC Hennix's myriad and esoteric mathematical interests, all of which inform her immersive electronic drone and raga (and which are touched upon inside the CD sleeve), but you don't need to understand them to become completely absorbed in this performance of 'Blues Dhika Al-Salam (Blues Al Maqam)' from Berlin last year. 50 minutes, a single key, a single drone, which simply builds in intensity, undulates, flickers, ripples and dies away. In the process it taps into the base materials of the world surrounding you, and excites them to glow a hazy gold." Rory Gibb

18. Wire - On The Box

"The thing that's really struck me, and the reason for the re-release, is that people know about the Rockpalast thing and have seen it on YouTube, but don't know that they can buy it. There's no mega corporations involved, it's our own label. 'Heartbeat' from it gets some interesting reactions on the YouTube page. There are people saying 'he's singing like a hobbit'. I've also seen 'these guys were really influenced by Joy Division' and 'these guys were really influenced by Primal Scream'. [laughs] YouTube is full of crap. I think a lot of people don't realise it was recorded in the 70s." Colin Newman

Read our On The Box feature here

17. Personal Space - Electronic Soul 1974-1984

"Personal Space deserves to become a series in the Nuggets or a Pebbles mould – there's even a song that repeats the refrain "I'm a man", an obligatory inclusion on many a garage rock bootleg. Key & Cleary's 'A Man' isn't a straight cover of Bo Diddley's 'I'm a Man'. But it does owe a little to its spirit, albeit shifting the discourse from primal and sexual to the politics of race in post-Civil Rights America: 'My muscles of steel/ My mind of complex computers/ My skin is black but still my blood is red/ My lips are white but still my heart is pure/ Nothing more/ Nothing less/ Just a man.'" Tim Burrows

Read our review of Personal Space here

16. Regis - Complete Works

"Karl O'Connor (aka Regis) has been a brutal instigator on the techno underground for over 15 years, instrumental in pioneering the disturbing situationist inventory that came to embody the mid 90s 'Birmingham sound'; slate grey monolithic chunks of audio, charged with oblique hypnotic undercurrents." Harry Sword

15. Morphosis - Live at Panoramabar (for mnml ssgs)

"An absolute masterclass in slowly unfurling, psychedelic dancefloor tension from Rabih Beaini. A recording of his recent opening set at Berlin's famous Panoramabar, it begins with an hour of near-beatless electronics and slowly creaks into life, before spending two hours diving deep into trippy techno territory. A reminder that the best DJing is adventurous and daring enough to confront dancers with sounds they might not expect." Rory Gibb

Listen to Live At Panoramabar here

14. Bo Ningen - Live At St Leonards Church

"Having met and formed in London a few years ago, Bo Ningen have since played numerous shows at pubs and clubs in the capital and beyond. Their well-deserved live reputation was secured with a show stealing performance at 2009's Offset festival; they were heavy, far out and they destroyed everything in their wake. By the end of the set members were either rolling around the floor in the debris of trashed drum kit and scattered fuzz boxes, or hanging upside down by their legs off one of the poles holding up the tent they were playing in. On their return to the festival in September 2010 they sought to repeat the feat, this time on the main stage. When wild-man drummer Mon-Chan terrified his band mates by climbing the entire outer frame of the stage, he made sure the name Bo Ningen was once again on the lips of witnesses afterwards." Richie Troughton

13. Disco Discharge – Disco Exotica

"I was a kid in the 1970s so I used to buy disco 7”s and the great compilation albums on Ronco and K-Tel. My real introduction was when I met my boyfriend (Steve Matthews) in the mid-80s. He’d been on the scene a bit longer than me. It’s quite clear that disco has come back into favour over the last four or five years, especially with the whole re-edit culture that’s sprung up. It was out of favour for quite a while but that’s not the case now. Horsemeat Disco has really helped pave the way for this kind of thing. Hopefully it will continue like this as well." Mr Pinks

Read our feature on Disco Discharge here

12. Levon Vincent - Fabric 63

"Vincent's records pull the sonic signatures of his adopted home of Berlin into the sensual orbit of New York house in a way few could hope to imitate. The results are as likely to be ugly as they are beautiful: uncanny, scorched timbres fall into odd configurations, gesturing towards dystopic techno without renouncing that seductive NY bump. Structures tend to be built around rupture, surprise and disorientation, sucking you into parallel worlds before spitting you back out on the crest of an enormous kick drum - a far cry from the reliably four-square tension-and-release patterns of many of his contemporaries. Angus Finlayson

Read our interview with Levon Vincent here

11. Cleaners From Venus – Midnight Cleaners

"Recorded largely by Newell on his own, now using a drum machine and more synthesizers, Midnight Cleaners is a masterpiece. It opens with the gorgeous instrumental 'This Rainy Decade', then Martin’s love of jangly guitars shines through with 'Time In Vain' and 'Only A Shadow', the latter recently covered by MGMT. The quality of the songwriting is impressive throughout, with the beautiful 'Corridor Of Dreams' and Martin’s magnum opus, 'Wivenhoe Bells II' being particular highlights. In 1986, Giles Smith would join the band (before embarking on his more well-known career as a journalist) and Martin would once again be thrown into the mechanism of the music industry. Smith ended up singing the songs on The Cleaners 1988 German tour as Martin stayed home, protesting that he would make more money during those weeks keeping his job as a gardener." Aug Stone

Read our feature on the Cleaners From Venus here

10. Laibach - Live At The Tate Modern

"The timing of Laibach's presence in the turbine hall of the Tate Modern is therefore fortuitous. With the decline of Western pop as a financial force and the end of Hollywood's romantic era, it's arguable that it has been replaced by the collection of high-concept art. Just on the other side of the walkway that divides this cavernous space, in a squat black bunker, sits the diamond-encrusted bauble that is Damien Hirst's skull. As the shadow cast by Laibach singer Milan Fras rises stories high up the southern wall of the turbine hall, you half wish that it'd reach backwards and grab the skull for an 'alas poor Yorick'." Luke Turner

Read our live review of Laibach Live At The Tate Modern here

9. Porter Ricks – Biokinetics

"Originally released in 1996 through Basic Channel-affiliated label Chain Reaction, this reissue by Type is the first time Thomas Köner and Andy Mellwig's seminal dub techno album has been widely available since its initial run. It's aged like a fine wine, its depth charged percussion and exquisite sound design pouring from the speakers like seawater." Rory Gibb

8. Paperclip People - The Secret Tapes Of Dr. Eich

"I've always had multiple projects on the go and released a lot of records. I put the work ethic down to the fact that I really enjoy my job. That’s what it comes down to. Also I’ve had the philosophy that you have to know when something is good. You can flog a dead horse but it won’t revive it. If after a certain amount of time something doesn’t work, I throw it away. If something doesn’t work in two hours, I’ll start on a new idea. I can always go back to it. It has to hit the right spot. When it does, I can move forward and finish it." Carl Craig

Read our interview with Carl Craig here

7. My Bloody Valentine – EPs & Rarities 1988-1991

"There's something unusual about the tremelo arm on the Jazzmaster. The spring is similar to a Bigsby, but they go all the way round. A Bigsby only goes round to there, but on the Jazzmaster you can pull it right over, and hold onto it the whole time you're playing. So I modified it, I moved it round and put tape on it so it wouldn't go all the way in, changed the bridge so it was super loose, more part of your hand than part of the guitar. So if you let go it would practically fall off. Actually, when I first tried it I thought "that's OK", but it wasn't really working. It was like an old rock & roll thing, like [Cramps guitarist] Poison Ivy, that sort of woooaaaaawwww noise. But I was really into hip-hop as well, and what I liked about that was that it used so many samples that were half-buried or muted, a real sense of sounds being semi-decayed, or destroyed, but then re-used. So I turned the tone on the guitar right down to see what happened... and suddenly it sounded great. Suddenly I had this... melted sound." Kevin Shields

Read our My Bloody Valentine feature here

6. Tortoise - Millions Now Living Will Never Die

"Tortoise didn't so much form as coalesce, gradually accumulating members who were frustrated with the limits of their previous, guitar-centric bands (which include Tar Babies, Eleventh Dream Day, Poster Children, Bastro and Slint). The germ of the band was the duo of Herndon and bassist Doug McCombs, 'a fantasy of being this rhythm section like Sly & Robbie that could operate alone or work with other groups, and was more about creating super-minimal interludes than actual songs.' Signalling their post-rock intentions, Tortoise was initially formulated as a guitar-free zone." Simon Reynolds

Read Tortoise on Tortoise here

5. Sunn O))) - 00Void

"If the radiance of a thousand suns were to burst at once into the sky, that would be like the splendour of the mighty one." Robert Oppenheimer

Read our meditation on the similarities SunnO))) share with dance music here

4. Black Rain - Now I'm Just A Number: Soundtracks 1994-95

"The seven tracks that make up Now I'm Just A Number: Soundtracks 1994-95 are all traversed by gloomy synths, heavy percussive patterns and a bleak atmosphere of post industrial ennui, and proved to be precocious in their approach to rhythm, texture and mood: despite their age, they sound unnervingly fresh within a modern day context." Joseph Burnett

Read our feature on Black Rain here

3. Sleep – Dopesmoker

Watch The Quietus this week for an interview with Al Cisneros of Sleep and Om

2. Swans - We Rose From Your Bed With The Sun In Our Head

"Encountering the might, majesty and physicality of the Swans live experience is in one moment transcendental, masochistic, liberating and an act of feeling subjugated to brute force expressed through the bloodying lashes of sound. They are, as the recordings collected on We Rose From Your Bed With The Sun In Our Head show, a 'with us or against' us kind of band, Old Testament in their offering and demanding of zeal and commitment." Luke Turner

Read our review of We Rose From Your Bed With Sun In Our Head here

1. Can - The Lost Tapes

Watch the Quietus this week for an extensive feature on The Lost Tapes featuring interviews with Irmin Schmidt, Holgar Czukay, Jaki Liebezeit and compiler Jono Podmore

  1. Can - The Lost Tapes
  2. Swans - We Rose From Your Bed With The Sun In Our Head
  3. Sleep – Dopesmoker
  4. Black Rain - Now I'm Just A Number
  5. Sunn O))) - 00Void
  6. Tortoise - Millions Now Living Will Never Die
  7. My Bloody Valentine – EPs
  8. Paperclip People [Carl Craig] - The Secret Tapes Of Dr. Eich
  9. Porter Ricks – Biokinetics
  10. Laibach - Live At The Tate Modern
  11. Cleaners From Venus – Midnight Cleaners
  12. Levon Vincent - Fabric 63
  13. Disco Discharge – Disco Exotica
  14. Bo Ningen - Live At St Leonards Church
  15. Morphosis - Live at Panoramabar (for mnml ssgs)
  16. Regis - Complete Works
  17. Personal Space - Electronic Soul 1974-1984
  18. Wire - On The Box
  19. Catherine Christer Hennix & The Chora(s)san Time Court Mirage - Live At The Grimm Museum
  20. Floating Points - Resident Advisor Mix
  21. Cornershop – Urban Turban
  22. Trevor Jackson – Metal Dance
  23. Boban I Marko Markovic Orkestar – Golden Horns
  24. WITCH - We Intend To Cause Havoc
  25. Various Artists - Shangaan Shake
  26. David Sylvian - A Victim Of Stars
  27. Quietus Mix 57 - Dead Sound & Videohead
  28. Drexciya - Journey of the Deep Sea Dweller Vol. II
  29. Peter Zummo & Arthur Russell - Zummo With An X
  30. The Cure – Pornography
  31. Pauline Oliveros - Reverberations: Tape & Electronic Music 1961-70
  32. Bitch Magnet - Umber
  33. Suede - Live At Royal Albert Hall
  34. The Heads – Radio Sessions
  35. Luk Thung – Classic & Obscure 78s From The Thai Countryside
  36. Minny Pops - Standstill to Motion: Live at the Melkweg, 19-03-1981
  37. Rob Booth - Electronic Explorations
  38. The Human League – Dare
  39. Sonic Router -
  40. Andrew Weatherall – Masterpiece
  41. The Quietus Mix 65 - Simian Mobile Disco
  42. Qat, Coffee and Qambus - Raw 45s From Yemen
  43. Penny Rimbaud – Acts Of Love
  44. The Body – The Body
  45. Atomic Forest – Obsession
  46. Suzanne Ciani – Lixiviation
  47. The Beat – I Just Can’t Stop It
  48. Soul Cal – Funky Disco & Modern Soul (1971 – 1982)
  49. Rob - Make It Fast, Make It Slow
  50. Catherine AD - Reprise - The Covers Collection

MB
Jul 9, 2012 12:58pm

I had no idea about The Body album. Thank you. Now off to hunt it down.

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Jul 13, 2012 6:27am

Really interesting list - a few things I need to track down. The Personal Space album is fantastic! Can I also recommend the CD reissue of Omar Khorshid's Guitar El Chark on the Sublime Frequencies label and Bruce Russell's compilation of 80's NZ bands - Time To Go, The Southern Psychedelic Moment.

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John Stamos
Jul 20, 2012 11:52am

MBV should be number 1. Fuck you twats. KEVIN SHIELDS ARMY

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Punky Peter
Jul 20, 2012 12:24pm

In reply to John Stamos:

Yessssssssss

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Sandra W
Jul 26, 2012 10:51pm

Nice to see The Human League's Dare has been chosen. I'd personally have Anthony Reynolds' Life's Too Long compilation in the Top 10. It's certainly the album I've listened to the most this year.

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