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Blur, The Olympics & The Never-ending 1990s Hangover
Luke Turner , February 21st, 2012 09:12

Blur's presence at the closing ceremony of the London Olympics is part of the legacy of New Labour, the '90s and the Millennium Dome, argues Luke Turner

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This morning, the 488 bus to work terminated early outside Hackney Wick, half a mile or so short of the office. What was wrong? "Something to do with the bloody Olympics, I bet" shouted one woman, snatching her ticket to carry on the rest of her journey. Continuing the rest of the way on foot, I walked past a new mural covering the side of an old industrial building that celebrates the coming Olympiad with a portrait of Usain Bolt, various other athletes, and a few hundred litres of red paint expended on Coca Cola branding. Last week, women with clipboards and bouncers were found here 'launching' the mural for ad agency M&C Saatchi. Typing this, sat at my desk, I can look out of the office window at the Olympic stadium, around which buses on tours of the site and diggers travel at breakneck speed. A few weeks ago, a strange oily sheen fringed with brown scum crept across the surface of the water of the canal outside.

Late last night, it was announced that Blur, The Specials and New Order were to play a 'Best Of British' night to coincide with the closing ceremony of the Olympics on August 15. Notwithstanding the fact that last time Blur played Hyde Park video evidence suggests appalling sound and people lobbing bottles around, this event smacks of the profound lack of imagination that characterises the London Olympic 2012 project, from the Wenlock & Mandeville mascots that resemble a cyclopean sex toy, to the inefficient and unfair ticketing system, to having Dow Chemical sponsor the stadium wrapping. Blur playing the closing ceremony gig typifies what is wrong with our approach to national identity and pride in the post New Labour age: mealy mouthed and corporate, based on empty iconography and nostalgia – nicely tied up in the promotional poster that features Britannia sat on one of the hippos that featured on the cover to Blur's 'She's So High' single. It suggests a 90s Cool Britannia hangover put together by branding consultants who've just collected their 20-year loyalty card from the Groucho Club and now simply rest on their laurels, wallowing in the only industry that Britain seems to be able to do well any more: nostalgia.

Of course, it could have been so much worse if the Simon Cowell end of the music industry had got their hands on the event. But why not demand better? Our national failing over the past few decades has been to never expect more, sliding into 'it'll do' torpor. Perhaps the line-up will evolve to include a better representation of 'Best Of British'. There are plenty of artists to choose from - say Cornershop, The Copper Family, Luke Haines, British Sea Power, Wild Beasts, PJ Harvey, Alexander Tucker, Michael Nyman, The Fall, Momus, Aidan Moffat, Kate Bush, Tricky, Kevin Martin, David Bowie, David Sylvian, Wire, Robert Wyatt, Portishead, Pet Shop Boys, Burial, the list goes on (please add yours below)... Anything but the mawkish sentimentality ('Tender' is surely the 'Imagine' of its decade) and ironic posturing of Blur who, let's not forget, turned their back on a British aesthetic when they became a Pavement-aping lo-fi band back in the late 1990s.

It's hard not to suspect, though, that these Olympic concerts (there'll also be events in East London's Victoria Park) will just be like the Wireless festival under a different name. Although tickets for the Blur bash are priced at £55, BT customers get priority booking - and VIP packages are available, just like at the Olympics themselves when only 29,000 members of the public will get to see the men's 100 metre final, and mega-rich VIPs will be able to buy access to the Olympic traffic lanes that will cause chaos for the rest of us for the duration of the games.

Though I am no fan of athletics, I can see how the Olympics would, if done properly, create some notion of physical agreement, of nations coming together in a shared appreciation of sport. Perhaps Ken Livingstone was telling the truth and not just grandstanding in 2008 when he said "I didn't bid for the Olympics because I wanted three weeks of sport. I bid for the Olympics because it's the only way to get the billions of pounds out of the Government to develop the East End - to clean the soil, put in the infrastructure and build the housing. It's exactly how I plotted it, to ensnare the Government to put money into an area it has neglected for 30 years." That's as maybe, but as someone who works within 30 feet of the Olympic site, and lives within two miles, I have seen very little evidence of any benefit to us locals. The vast, chain-store dominated Westfield Mall? Cheers! The Olympic park will, in a few months, be one of the most heavily policed sites on the planet. Yet just the other week a woman was mugged at knifepoint on the unlit canal towpath just past the yellow cages that mark the security perimeter of the Olympics.

The whole show just feels like a terrible hangover from the late 1990s. The involvement of Blur with a few nods along the way to past glories seems like the epitome of Cool Britannia braggadocio. Livingstone's plot to use the global corporate jamboree that is the Olympics to the very New Labour ploy of using corporate money rather than progressive taxation in an attempt to kickstart regeneration. Even the naff branding and mascots looks very 1990s. It all adds up to the sense that much of the Olympic project and much-vaunted 'legacy' might amount to nothing more than a rerun of the Millennium Dome debacle. And, unlike the Millennium Dome, you won't be able to host Blur gigs at the tangled rust-red sculpture of Anish Kapoor's taxpayer funded ArcelorMittal Orbit which is made of thousands of tons of steel sourced from Belgium to Kazakhstan, China to Luxembourg, Brazil to the Ukraine. Everywhere, of course, except Great Britain.

Thomas Peacock
Feb 21, 2012 2:51pm

1) When I was at the Hyde Park gig the sound was fine throughout.
2) I'm in that video of bottles being thrown...firstly they were empty plastic bottles, secondly it was just a bit of fun and games about an hour before Blur were even on the stage- people were getting on eachothers shoulders and asking for bottles to be thrown. It was a beautiful summer's day and there was nobody getting genuinely upset by it, plus everyone was very drunk and in good spirits.
3) Why not focus on the dad-rock of notoriously patchy live band New Order- which is far worse than Blur. Surely that's looking further back and hey...we go into the Thatcher years....preferable to 'cool britannia'?! I think not.
4) Blur have long been the face of 'british' and have become so again since their reunion...look at the british gas advert and the fact their music was used on Beagle 2- they've had a longstanding relationship with 'Britishness' whether you or I like it or not (although fair point on the eponymous album+Tender). Furthermore the bands you mention, whilst mostly brilliant, are essentially a critics wet dream. It's meant to be a celebration of Britishness, how on earth would the likes of Sylvian, The Fall, Portishead and Tricky add to the party celebration atmosphere...?! (Fair point on David Bowie though) They'd have probably asked Oasis if they were about y'know, which is far more backward than Blur and something that serves as a far more painful reminder of all things crap from Britain.

I think the whole point is mawkish sentimentality, this was never going to be about the best, it's basically three giants going for the big pay day. I'm not looking forward to the Olympics at all, and by proxy this looks a bit naff... But to so strongly criticise it for what is basically meant as a fun day out is just not a battle worth fighting.

After all, nobody is forcing you to watch and I'm sure all those going wont give a hoot.

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Dan B
Feb 21, 2012 2:59pm

Why don't they have The Fall and Alexander Tucker at the gigs? Because they want people to have fun.

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Trev
Feb 21, 2012 3:03pm

The alternative 'Best Of British' choices you put forward are also largely nostalgic though, i feel you might be trying to illustrate a point though. With those acts in mind, it's kind of like saying let's do a gig for the mainstream public and have The Cure headline-it wouldn't work.

I imagine they choose Blur because in a way it pleases everyone, people like us don't complain too much, everybody knows who they are, they're quintessentially British and i guess a treat cos their live appearances are few and far between nowadays. The last point applies goes for New Order and to a lesser extent The Specials (it's not really the Specials without Jerry). I admit these are hardly the best choices but who's actually playing these days that could pull off a gig of that size and quality for such a wide range of people? And that's a shame really.

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guv jones
Feb 21, 2012 3:07pm

Imagine if this was the line up: Bands from the same eras and genres as the actual line up.

Pulp
Cabaret Voltaire
The Selecter

I'd love it but people would be pissed off.

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Peter Pan
Feb 21, 2012 3:07pm

I really didn't know that Blur were playing their cheeky chappy mockney oh there's Jamie Oliver on his moped, diamond geezer "indie" at the end of the Olympics. I do now. Gadzooks (bangs head repeatedly against the wall).

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Thomas Peacock
Feb 21, 2012 3:08pm

Also, I might add that the real cop out would be if fucking Elbow were performing....

Now THAT would be fucking infuriating.

If I hear 'One Day Like This' at any point during the summer I might just hurt somebody.

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h0oVer
Feb 21, 2012 3:12pm

Aren't you - creative types with a fledgling business - just the sort of thing the regeneration of Stratford is supposed to be encouraging? Would you be there without the Olympic development? Just wondering. I only know the area from occasional visits and passing through on the train to Clacton, and as much as I can be cynical about the whole Olympic project, I've always been reasonably happy with the fact that money would come into what was a fairly dismal and neglected part of the city.

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sleepman1982
Feb 21, 2012 3:13pm

Can you imagine The Fall playing it. Kids' would be pissing out tears whilst Mark E Smith mumbles through tracks from Ersartz GB and Reformation Post TLC; his gummy face beaming out to confused cagoul wearing satellite town dwellers from large LCD screens

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Brett
Feb 21, 2012 3:13pm

The line up just seems like a sliding scale of 'Brit-rock' for people who have got to the age where going to a concert is an event where they relive their youth, and not as a regular part of their life (which I suppose is fair enough. Heaton Park in June will be the same deal.

Given a couple of years, and you could have easily added the Libertines to the bill. It seems a bit liked pre-packed 'good taste'/Campaign For Real Music to me.

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Brett
Feb 21, 2012 3:14pm

The line up just seems like a sliding scale of 'Brit-rock' for people who have got to the age where going to a concert is an event where they relive their youth, and not as a regular part of their life (which I suppose is fair enough. Heaton Park in June will be the same deal.

Given a couple of years, and you could have easily added the Libertines to the bill. It seems a bit liked pre-packed 'good taste'/Campaign For Real Music to me.

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jimmy cricket
Feb 21, 2012 3:17pm

blur are playing a gig in honour of the olympics? i didnt know it was possible to despise that band anymore...

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DC
Feb 21, 2012 3:32pm

You get a bus for a 2 mile journey? Bloody Londoners.

I agree with the general sentiment of a few of the comments here already - this feels like a fairly decent compromise by the organisers. I don't really like Blur, but I'd rather have them playing than One Direction/another X Factor act.

Out of all of the artists you mentioned in the piece, I don't believe that anyone other than Bowie would go down well with the majority of the general public.

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Feb 21, 2012 3:33pm

They've obviously been chosen for their "Britishness", but Blur's version of that is so disingenuous and pantomimic that we're all going to come off look like plonkers. Where the fuck is Dizzy Rascal on that bill? He grew up out that way and has hit records.

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Michael
Feb 21, 2012 3:36pm

The Olympics is the very definition of a populist event. While I'll concede your list of artists is far more interesting, it's also incredibly naive. When Celine Dion performed at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver (where I was living at the time), we in-the-know Canadians weren't wringing our hands that organizers hadn't opted for Peaches and Fucked Up instead.

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Dan B
Feb 21, 2012 3:37pm

I take your point that the regeneration hasn't seen any net benefits to you sport-hating non-corporate types, but the kind of things you want (let me guess: independent places, places of merit and culture, that appreciate the culture-rich and cash-poor left-field left-wing) are never catered for in urban regeneration. Indeed, these communities often spring up in places that are neglected, that have been passed over for the next big regeneration celebré du jour, and are the ones that get steamrollered out of town when the spirit of the area is recognised by developers looking to cash in on low rents and spurious levels of cool. Those kind of things can't just be 'created' by committee, and even if they were, many of the aching London zeitgeist chasers they were created for would sneer at them for lacking the requisite authenticity or ability to be easily fetishised. Shit like this, doing stuff that is created to meet the needs of lot of people, is a no-win game.

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cf
Feb 21, 2012 3:46pm

I think it's important not to conflate these acts with the morality of the Olympic project. Like many have said, Blur are a hugely popular band who only really play these sort of one-off gigs any more. This isn't supposed to be a new music showcase - it's a sporting ceremony and therefore has to appeal to a fairly broad spectrum. This strawman perception that Blur were nothing but a mawkish cockney knees-up caricature is a huge generalisation often pointed at them by people who are only familiar with certain hits from the Parklife/Great Escape era, and isn't really representative. You could take pot shots at pretty much any band with any sort of schtick.

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Paul Cage
Feb 21, 2012 4:11pm

I know! Let's put Cornershop, The Fall and Aidan Moffat(?) on stage while the world watches on TV, and you'd hear a collective 'Whaaaaaa?' echoing from around the globe. At least Blur have been making good music with mass appeal for the last 20 years, something of an achievement I'd say. And they have proven themselves at huge events without resorting to stadium spectacle a la U2 etc.

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1865
Feb 21, 2012 4:18pm

Oh, that's good to see - another east end media/creative type moaning. And better, moaning about the Olympics! You don't get much of either these days do you?

I imagine you'd be just the same at a children's party: all "the music's so crao" and "but what's in this for ME?" and "the designs are frankly, shit". Stop whining and go and do something useful, eh?

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Swisslet
Feb 21, 2012 4:31pm

Enough about the ticketing system. How exactly would you have done it in a fairer way? As a gig-goer, I assume you appreciate that first-come-first served would have been far worse. I presume you dont want to attend any events yourself, but the British public's sense of entitlement is remarkable. I agree in part about the number of corporate jamborees there will be at the games, and I wish MORE tickets were available to the public, but the cost of the games to the public would be even higher without the corporate shilling.
Re. The gig... Well, a Cowell run event would be worse, as you say. No one is making anyone go, right? British culture will carry on regardless, right?

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uncle D
Feb 21, 2012 5:15pm

not one grime or hip hop act from east London at all, just the fucking musical pond life that is Blur, because half the Beatles are dead, another missed opportunity....

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uncle d
Feb 21, 2012 5:16pm

In reply to Thomas Peacock:

your opinion is void, you like Blur.

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uncle d
Feb 21, 2012 5:17pm

In reply to Michael:

well you should of been..

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Humperdinck
Feb 21, 2012 8:33pm

Thank fuck its not Oasis reforming for the show. How come there's no slagging off of the Specials or New Order in the piece? Surely there's two more examples of wallowing in nostalgia from bygone days... or perhaps they're more reflective of Tory repression and therefore more relevant than any band associated with champaign socialism. Still, I had a fucking great time in the 90s. Fuck knows what you were doing?

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Jon
Feb 21, 2012 9:41pm

I understand what you're saying - and I'm American, though pretty adept at understanding the British music scene. However, I do agree that the olympics is something that you do make cheesy, broad-interest based, "fun", and nostalgic. Nostalgia is a must typically because most of the rest of the world identifies a given country with what they have learned in the past. When we hosted the 1996 games, some of the "best" albums around the time were Smashing Pumkins' Mellon Collie, Weezer's Pinkerton, if you even wanted to go back a few years to something contemporary American at the time, you could include Pearl Jam, Pavement, etc. But, we had Little Richard, Al Green, Michael Jackson, Whitney Houston, Stevie Wonder - hugely successful and undeniably AMERICAN artists, and also artists that, despite their career success, hadn't been relevant since prior to the 1990s at least. But, that's the way things are - I guess as an alternative/indie-centric publication, you should be pleased its Blur and not the Rolling Stones, Paul McCartney (who's playing the opening ceremony, but hey, he thinks he's great enough to probably warrant playing both), or Elton John.

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Reggie P
Feb 21, 2012 9:42pm

Spoken like a true Suede man, Luke ;)

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Wil
Feb 21, 2012 11:56pm

Or maybe they're playing because millions of people love their songs and they know how to put on an awesome show for large crowds (check out video from Glastonbury '09 - Blur absolutely killed headlining for two nights).

And I understand that you'd like a more modern band to headline, but who among the bands you mentioned has songs fit for this occasion? Are British Sea Power or Burial really going to get a crowd of 50,000+ singing along at a celebration concert? Would putting an icon on stage from the 70's (Bowie) really be that much more forward looking?

Maybe we should just enjoy what this is - a very good band playing for an occasion that was custom made for their style - and leave all the sociological analysis on the side. Just enjoy it, you know?

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Feb 22, 2012 12:00am

This piece is moronic.
We've booked your first gig Mr Burial. It's Hyde Park. Closing the Olympics.
It's painful how people drop Burial's name. This one's a classic.

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Wil
Feb 22, 2012 12:32am

In reply to :

If you really think their version of Britishness is "disingenuous and pantomimic", then you've totally missed the point of their best work. Blur's music at its best wasn't a celebration of Britishness - it a was satire of the cheap and easy British-isms that pervaded British culture in the early 90's, and a lot of it centered around coming to grips with the final crumbling vestiges of Empire. That's what Parklife was really all about, and why as an album it carries emotional resonance with lots of people almost two decades after it was released. If listening to This is a Low doesn't convince you of this, nothing will. It frustrates me that people misunderstand this.

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Gareth
Feb 22, 2012 12:36am

When I woke up this morning and read this news, I felt so uneasy. You hit the nail on the head perfectly. It's as uninspired as their incredibly stupid decision in picking London Calling as the Olympics theme song (does anyone listen to those lyrics?). I was never a big Blur fan, but Damon seemed to get better after they split. This seems like a move 90's Damon would approve of.

Your list of the Best of British to play at the Olympics is fantastic. Luke Haines, PJ, Wire, the Fall, Pet Shop Boys, and the rest are ace. Surely Tindersticks could get the crowd just as rowdy. And is it too early to add Factory Floor?

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Luke Turner
Feb 22, 2012 1:21am

In reply to Wil:

No, all the things you describe are what Pulp and Suede did, taking those elements of Britishness into ideas of class and sex. That was Blur's failing - they merely made crass, glib, cliche. This Is A Low is a case in point - first listen, fuck, mindblowing. Then you actually sit listening to the Shipping Forecast every night for a week, imaging the shifting weather systems and all the people out at sea, picturing the coast as it meets the water and the geography that is the result of that, and the shite rhyming of the Blur song is exposed: 'right, so, like, this is about National Identity, so like we've got the Queen, better get here in there, take the piss, make her look barmy Bavarian imbred so er, yeah, she's mad, like. Where on the coast is mad, fackin hell mate yeah, round the bend, right rhymes with Land's End. So "the Queen she's gone round the bend / Jumped off Land's End". What a lyricist!

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Wil
Feb 22, 2012 3:00am

In reply to Luke Turner:

nah, your dismissal of This is a Low based on that one rhyming couplet is a straw man - Damon's body of work outside of Blur ( especially with The Good the Bad and the Queen, and his work in Africa) suggests pretty strongly that his social/political views are much more sophisticated than that. Taken in the context of the entire song it holds up, even if it's not the most meaningful lyric he ever put to paper.

And there was nothing glib or cliche about their really good early work (Modern Life is Rubbish - Parklife). Those were honest expressions of what it felt like to grow up in post-Thatcher London, ones that I related to strongly as a kid growing up in similar circumstances. They lost the plot a bit with the Great Escape, but since they were able to grow beyond that phase, I don't think that album defines them as a band.

(and by the way, thanks for replying, I happen to really like Pulp and Suede as well, and as a child of the 90's I love arguing about all this stuff)

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bar har
Feb 22, 2012 8:49am

Robert Wyatt on the list... he should headline, perhaps climaxing with 'Pigs (in there)'. But he doesn't sing live these days, alas. I'd pay a fortune to touts if they revived the original Soft Machine for this. Somewhat unlikely but a preferable type of nostalgia, for me if not for many others. Still, Wyatting should be an Olympic sport.

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Kitsune
Feb 22, 2012 8:50am

It was never going to happen, but I was rather hoping for Iron Maiden to do the Olympic show.They came from the area, are big enough to be known worldwide and are full of British imagery.

Not a chance, but a nice thought all the same.

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Thomas Peacock
Feb 22, 2012 9:30am

In reply to uncle d :

all our opinions are void because we read and comment on quietus articles.

We'll all just disagree with eachother anyway.

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Thomas Peacock
Feb 22, 2012 9:43am

In reply to Luke Turner:

Sorry, Luke. You dismiss one line of 'This is a Low' when 75% of the lyrics on Suede's first album in particular are overblown purple-proes nonsense...

But don't worry, because I'm sure you'll tell me that "that's the point of it"... I still love Suede for what they are, equally I like Pulp and Blur for what they are and what they say. Whilst all very talented they have very obvious flaws unless you feel like you 'get' them which just fast-tracks you to accepting them.

And Pulp were, let's face it, a bit shit, until they started fitting in with the rest of Damon & Co.

If only we had National Front Disco era Morrissey to close the ceremony...at least that'd be amusing in a dark way.

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dirigible
Feb 22, 2012 10:20am

"Aren't you - creative types with a fledgling business - just the sort of thing the regeneration of Stratford is supposed to be encouraging?"

Such people always moan about how gentrified the area they moved into has become since they moved in.

And they are always serious.

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Dan B
Feb 22, 2012 11:05am

I very much enjoyed this article on the '90s hangover and am now going to read Neil Kulkarni's articles on Pram, Disco Inferno, and Insides. JOKE!

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Luke Turner
Feb 22, 2012 11:23am

In reply to dirigible:

Not me. I love the improvements in Hackney over recent years. You can wander around at night without being afraid of getting mugged, gang violence is way down, the streets are cleaner, the crack houses are largely gone AND you get to spend four quid on a loaf of bread if you are stupid enough to do so.

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Daniel
Feb 22, 2012 11:25am

"I am no fan of athletics... Cornershop... The Fall, Momus, Aidan Moffat..... The vast, chain-store dominated Westfield Mall?" blah blah blah. Jesus man, pull yourself together.

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Luke Turner
Feb 22, 2012 11:31am

In reply to Daniel:

hahaha *hat off*

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Tobin Postma
Feb 22, 2012 12:04pm

Re: ArcelorMittal Orbit - £19.6 million (out of the £22.7 million it cost to build the ArcelorMittal Orbit) has been privately funded by ArcelorMittal. We employ over 600 people in the UK, and while most of the 2,000 tonnes of steel for the Orbit was made in Luxembourg, it was all fabricated in Bolton by Watson Steel - a British Company.

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Chloe George
Feb 22, 2012 12:16pm

I hate the corporate stink over near Stratford as much as anyone, so if Kate Bush and PJ Harvey got involved I'd run screaming from London even faster than I'm planning to in June/July this year. Let's at least leave some people untainted by all the Cool Britannia nonsense ...

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CF
Feb 22, 2012 1:10pm

"WELCOME ONE AND ALL TO OUR SHITTY LONDON OLYMPICS 2012. WE ARE SO PROUD OF OUR DOGMUCK PAVEMENTS AND GREY SKIES. HERE IS LUKE HAINES TO TELL YOU HOW BRILLIANT IT ALL IS. DON'T GET MUGGED ON THE WAY HOME, NOW FUCK OFF." The Management

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Daniel
Feb 22, 2012 3:03pm

In reply to Luke Turner:

;)

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EarlGinger
Feb 22, 2012 4:34pm

I can take or leave Blurs songs. Its Albarns mockney ego and his cheese-mongering Tory dipstick bass player that make me dislike them. Blur aren't too crap for the Olympics, on the contrary, if they're to represent modern Britain they're just not crap enough (nomatter how hard they try). New Order and Blur were the brown wallpaper of the 80s and 90s: boring and inescapable. For the 21st Century: let 'em eat X-factor. The crowds aren't there for the music after all - might as well have Jordan singing The Teletubbies theme while Jessie J and One Direction fire pingpong balls from the wings for all the difference it makes. Actually that might be better than Blur...

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Charlie
Feb 22, 2012 5:51pm

In reply to Daniel:

Haha *nailed it*

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Matthew B
Feb 22, 2012 11:47pm

In reply to EarlGinger:

'Blur aren't too crap for the Olympics' sums up the whole London 2012 nonsense more than anything. Shit sport and fake culture while the social fabric of the country is being destroyed. Admittedly, I know nothing I'm 41, get rained on regularly at Manchester City, hate Oasis - the Brits last night for Christ's sake - and Split would be my preferred Olympic 90s hangover though that's just me. Lush for 2012!

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A.J.Smith
Feb 23, 2012 9:22am

"Cornershop, The Copper Family, Luke Haines, British Sea Power, Wild Beasts, PJ Harvey, Alexander Tucker, Michael Nyman, The Fall, Momus, Aidan Moffat, Kate Bush, Tricky, Kevin Martin, David Bowie, David Sylvian, Wire, Robert Wyatt, Portishead, Pet Shop Boys, Burial"... BLAH BLAH BLAH , nearly all all at least as boring predictable and tediously worthy choices as Blur are and all realistically far less entertaining for a gig of this scale. (Bowie being the only exception to my second point, but he's out of commission these days so is hardly a fair example (to Blur or him) of an alternate choice.)
I hate "Tender" but comparing it to "Imagine" is a poorly thought out and off-base comparison. Far more accurate would be Graham Cxon's own assesment of the song (during his solo period) when he compared "Tender" to "Late period fat era Elvis".. that shoe fits! Funny too. Coxon should've written this article, he'd have a far more accurate and cutting take on Blur's failings.

The best thing about this article is the retexted back cover to "Parklife".. makes me wish a Blur album with songs called that really existed.. it would be their take on Huey Lewis's "Sports" opus.

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slobadan
Feb 26, 2012 1:12pm

In reply to Luke Turner:

Yes since they got rid of the oiks it has improved. Bloody poor people.

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get-callaghan
Feb 28, 2012 2:42pm

Good to see the local Grime scene on the bill. What about Duran Duran and The Fall.

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Tricky Dicky
Feb 29, 2012 1:00pm

Is there not a heck of a lot of legislated nostalgia involved in Blurs triumphant return (return from what? they only split up for 5 minutes and all 4 members stayed reasonably high profile in the interim). I certainly don't understand how they came to be seen as a " much-loved " British band. Don't get me wrong I was a fan of Blur. The first single I ever bought was Stereotypes but it's because I know about them from first time around that I feel I can say they were never " much-loved ".
Begrudgingly respected yes, but much-loved???? Even Justine Frischmann thought they were a shower of wankers.
I agree about Tender. It puts me in mind of Rod, Jane and Freddy having a crack at a Spiritusalized type song.

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Mar 2, 2012 9:09pm

line up should be the rolling stones (nothing after the 80s allowed ? was miss u in the 70s? , pink floyd , eddy grant ( yep! ) , the ragga twins , the prodigy , blur ( the accountant and norms ) the fall ,primal scream , pj harvey , dj scotch egg ( a jap but practically one of ours ), the streets , chemical bros and noely g guest vox ) , super furry animals , gang of four , the real new order , a massive battle between wiley, giggs , sparks and kye and trim with beats by becoming real , and wild geese , tusk wax , horse meat disco carl cox old skool set 1 love yeah

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Adam
Aug 13, 2012 8:04am

Ha ha events proved this article to be a proper pile of poop!

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