The Quietus - A new rock music and pop culture website

Baker's Dozen

The Sounds Of Planet Earth: Nick Rhodes Of Duran Duran’s Favourite Albums
John Freeman , April 15th, 2013 08:16

As his long-standing side-project TV Mania finally releases an album, Bored With Prozac And The Internet?, Duran Duran’s Nick Rhodes reveals the 13 albums that changed his perceptions about music

Add your comment »

“I was horrified when I saw the email come through asking whether I would choose 13 albums.” Nick Rhodes, keyboard player and one of the original members of Duran Duran, is experiencing the very common reaction to our Baker’s Dozen concept. “It’s impossible – I could choose 13 David Bowie albums,” he says and I, for one, believe him.

We are sitting in a smart South London recording studio and Rhodes is on fine form. Ice has been broken – we’ve already swapped stories about school detentions. I tell Nick that my one-and-only detention throughout my school career was due to Duran Duran. I turned up late to school one morning in 1983 as I’d decided I ‘needed’ to buy their ‘Is There Something I Should Know?’ single as soon as the local record shop opened on the morning of its release. I was grassed up by a classmate who preferred Spandau Ballet and copped a week’s worth of detentions. Nick tells me his only detention was sparked by a geography teacher proclaiming that “the forestry industry was undergoing a period of growth” which left the young Rhodes in a fit of uncontrollable – but punishable - giggles.

As we begin to discuss his 13 favourite albums, Nick is at pains to set the scene. “When it came to it, I tried to find things that I truly believed changed things for me, and for music, by people who thought differently and had the will and the energy to make these records. Musicianship is great and forward-thinking is great but having the attitude to pull things off is half the battle. Every one of the records I’ve chosen has a completely uncompromising attitude about it.”

Rhodes’ list is an expansive mash-up of multiple genres and while Duran Duran may not have quite displayed the level of innovation inherent within his choices, it’s easy to see how a love of glam, punk, disco, funk, art-rock and electronic music forged the early Duran sound.

After discussing nine of the albums, Nick’s publicist disturbs our peace in an attempt to wrap up the interview. Nick tells her that we will be a while and that the next interviewer – a dude from an expensive gentlemen’s magazine - will need to wait. “Maybe ten more minutes?” she says, trying to keep the tight schedule on track. “It’ll be closer to 20,” Rhodes tells me, out of the kindly publicist’s earshot. “We haven’t even got onto David Bowie yet.”

Bored With Prozac And The Internet? by TV Mania is out now; click on Nick's image below to begin scrolling through his choices.

Nr_1366024035_resize_460x400



echar
Apr 15, 2013 3:08pm

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this. Thank you.

Reply to this Admin

NB
Apr 15, 2013 3:18pm

Great list, and a wonderful piece of Accidental Partridge: "Somebody had the forethought and the invention to actually come up with something with electronic sequencing that people could dance to. It pulsated in a different way. That person was Giorgio Moroder."

Reply to this Admin

Jet Age Eric
Apr 15, 2013 3:45pm

Fantastic!

Reply to this Admin

Kevan Dalzell
Apr 15, 2013 3:49pm

My only beef with the article, is I wish it was 529 pages longer! Thanks a million! Off to read about Justin Hawkins and Dr Patterson.

Reply to this Admin

Evan
Apr 15, 2013 5:14pm

Nice article, and interesting insights... But to say 'Chopin's Nocturnes didn't change anything' is just a different way of saying: 'I don't know anything about classical music.'

Reply to this Admin

Ron Pile
Apr 15, 2013 5:22pm

Thatcherism in 1976? She gets more effective/evil by the day!

Reply to this Admin

Post-Punk Monk
Apr 15, 2013 5:55pm

Good 'Ol Nick Rhodes®! Such wit. Such taste. Such intelligence. Duran Duran have had many ups and downs, but it would have been all downs without his influence. Good list, too. Lots of mutual favorites on it, but I can't believe he only heard "Fresh!" in 1985?! Gott In Himmel, the Avedon cover shot was an iconic part of my childhood!

http://postpunkmonk.wordpress.com
for further rumination on the Fresh New Sound of Yesterday®

Reply to this Admin

Gar
Apr 15, 2013 9:14pm

Never went to see Kraftwerk before but gets to see them THREE times in the Tate, when the rest of us peasants have to press refresh for eight hours for nothing. F**k that

Reply to this Admin


Apr 15, 2013 10:40pm

pleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeesssssssssssssssssss find someone who won't have one of the following on their list:
Bowie
Velvet Underground/Lou Reed
Stooges/Iggy
Kraftwerk

It's so boring and predictable.

Reply to this Admin

Apop
Apr 16, 2013 8:08am

In reply to :

Yeah, a lot of these folks grew up in the 60s and 70s so these musically altering bands (Velvet, Kraftwerk, et all) are to be ignored. Could someone please give a shout out to Loggins and Messina... or maybe Gerry Rafferty? Damn.

Reply to this Admin

Dooberry
Apr 16, 2013 8:47am

Loved his choices, but the Beatles album is not eponymous. It's called "The White Album", even though it's not written on the cover (Nick was correct, the editorial caption was wrong)

Reply to this Admin


Apr 16, 2013 9:37am

In reply to Dooberry:

I think you'll find it's titled "The Beatles". It's popularly known as "The White Album".

Reply to this Admin

Dooberry
Apr 16, 2013 9:49am

In reply to :

Cool - thanks! I learned something new today :)

Reply to this Admin

Scott
Apr 16, 2013 12:27pm

Completely shocked there's no mention of Japan. Nick Rhodes stole his whole image from David Sylvian didn't he?

Reply to this Admin

MargyC
Apr 16, 2013 9:06pm

This is a damned fine selection. And this comes from someone who loathed Duran Duran. The evil witch was elected in 1979 though.

Reply to this Admin

Chris Familton
Apr 16, 2013 10:37pm

what a flawless list!

Reply to this Admin

Shannon M.
Apr 16, 2013 10:55pm

In reply to Apop:

Loggins and Messina? Really? Ok, maybe not but I hear you about having some variety. I'm pretty surprised he didn't include anything by Roxy Music actually.

Reply to this Admin

Dave
Apr 18, 2013 11:12am

In reply to Scott:

And then never bothered to change it! He still looks like he walked off the cover of Gentlemen Take Polaroids

Reply to this Admin

Metal Mickey
Apr 18, 2013 12:14pm

In reply to :

Agreed that the same names keep coming up again and again in this feature, but they're classic records for a reason...

I remember from the mid-70's to the mid-80's, the standard rock answer to "Who are your influences" was always, without fail, "Bowie, Roxy, Velvets..."

Reply to this Admin

Mingitrash
May 2, 2013 6:20am

That's why Duran Duran are simply the best in music industry....They were used listening to masterpieces,especially during the 70's.Legend goes on

Reply to this Admin

Didi
May 2, 2013 9:20pm

Brilliant list and very diverse. Nick is an exceptional guy.

Reply to this Admin

JDKMS
Sep 1, 2013 7:43pm

Ofcourse it's predictable. He even left out Roxy?

As for all these choices being all-encompassing rock music - some of us would place Van Halen, Iron Maiden and Black Sabbath over Bowie and Iggy. These fashionista/socialist/British working class, artist types don't get much out of their little circle.

Reply to this Admin

tripp
Nov 10, 2013 6:12pm

In reply to Scott:

True. Without Japan there would be no Duran Duran. They ripped off Japan. N

Reply to this Admin