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Tricycle Goes Nuclear Film Festival Launches
Manish Agarwal , March 21st, 2012 12:39

Thought-provoking programme at Kilburn's premier picturehouse

As our government maintains its nonsensical commitment to Trident ballistic missiles, the Kilburn Tricycle presents a timely season examining the history of the nuclear weapons debate.

The end of the world - as viewed from South Yorkshire - beckons tomorrow (Thursday March 22) with a free afternoon screening of the BBC's classic '80s teleplay Threads. Running until Sunday, the schedule also includes Stanley Kramer's post-apocalyptic message movie On The Beach and an obligatory outing (followed by panel discussion) for Stanley Kubrick's deathless satire Dr Strangelove Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb.

There are choice double bills of Alain Resnais' proto-Nouvelle Vague drama Hiroshima mon amour alongside fellow Left Bank auteur Chris Marker's sci-fi montage La jetée; plus Peter Watkins' controversial Oscar-winning fictional documentary The War Game, paired with Jimmy T. Murakami's animated feature When The Wind Blows. Although largely soundtracked by Roger Waters, this inspired adaptation of the Raymond Briggs graphic novel boasts an oft-forgotten David Bowie theme tune (see video below).

Further highlights include The Atomic Cafe compilation of 1940-60s radiation themed newsreel clips, public service announcements, military training films, etc. and, from a disarmament perspective, the recent anti-nuke campaigning doc Countdown To Zero. Be sure to read David Moats' tQ article on 'benign propaganda' discussing the latter, and check the theatre's website for a complete list of Tricycle Goes Nuclear events, cinematic and otherwise.

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